Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to find 10 posts that were not LIKED by user "mike" using cypher. Will putting a where clause with a NOT relationship be efficient than matching with an optional relationship then checking if that relationship is null in the where clause? Specifically I want to make sure it won't do the equivalent of a full table scan and make sure that this is a scalable query.

Here's what I'm using

START user=node:node_auto_index(uname:"mike"), 
  posts=node:node_auto_index("postId:*") 
  WHERE not (user-[:LIKES]->posts) 
  RETURN posts SKIP 20 LIMIT 10;

Or can I do something where I filter on a MATCH optional relationship

START user=node:node_auto_index(uname="mike"),
  posts=node:node_auto_index("postId:*")
  MATCH user-[r?:LIKES]->posts  
  WHERE r IS NULL
  RETURN posts SKIP 100 LIMIT 10;

Some quick tests on the console seem to show faster performance in the 2nd approach. Am I right to assume the 2nd query is faster? And, if so why?

share|improve this question
1  
your second query is the same as the 1st one, except the SKIP 100 value. shouldn't there be a MATCH clause somewhere? –  ulkas Jan 14 '13 at 9:25
    
Doh, yes, copy and paste error. Question updated with the correct 2nd example now. –  MonkeyBonkey Jan 14 '13 at 14:47

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

i think in the first query the engine runs through all postID nodes and manually checks the condition of not (user-[:LIKES]->posts) for each post ID whereas in the second example (assuming you use at least v1.9.02) the engine picks up only the post nodes, which actually aren't connected to the user. this is just optimalization where the engine does not go through all postIDs nodes.

if possible, always use the MATCH clause in your queries instead of WHERE, and try to omit the asterix in the declaration START n=node:index('name:*')

share|improve this answer
    
If I omit the asterix in the start clause what would the alternative syntax be? –  MonkeyBonkey Jan 14 '13 at 19:50
    
this is a question related to your graph design - if you must query often in real time that query, maybe it would be better to redesign the graph till you can execute the query without an asterix. sometimes this can't be done, however. could you please provide us with your current db design and goals? –  ulkas Jan 15 '13 at 8:30
    
it's a graph of "users" and "posts". I use the auto_index on "name" (for users) and "postId" for posts to discriminate the node type. Users can like posts. Every day, I want to let users browse a random set of hundreds of posts that they have not yet liked. For the sake of illustration, let's say that per day there will be millions of posts viewed a day compared with 200,000 posts "liked", 20,000 posts created, and thousands of user registrations. –  MonkeyBonkey Jan 15 '13 at 18:33
    
hmm, dunno maybe filtering on WHERE just after START declaration could help: START user=node:node_auto_index(uname="mike") MATCH user-[r:LIKES]->posts WITH MAX(Id(posts)) as mx,user START p=node:node_auto_index("postId:*") MATCH user-[r?:LIKE]-p WHERE Id(p)>mx AND Id(p)<(mx+100) and r is NULL RETURN p LIMIT 10; ? –  ulkas Jan 16 '13 at 15:00
    
fix: START user=node:node_auto_index(uname="mike") MATCH user-[r:LIKES]->posts WITH MAX(Id(posts)) as mx,user START p=node:node_auto_index("postId:*") WHERE Id(p)>mx AND Id(p)<(mx+100) MATCH user-[r?:LIKE]-p WHERE r is NULL RETURN p LIMIT 10; ?` –  ulkas Jan 16 '13 at 15:06

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.