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I have two main tables:

  1. Books (id, author, isbn, ...)
  2. Users (id, username, password, ...)

I am looking at building an application, wherein User1 logs in and can:

  1. view list of all books (eg. only title)
  2. view details (author, isbn, ...) of only certain books that he should have access to

Each user may have access to a certain set of books. I don't need various roles.

I have setup the MVC and the relationships (habtm) for the above. I am now looking at developing the permissions. Do you think the CakePHP ACL solves this problem or is it overkill?

If it is overkill, is there another component or easier way to build the desired functionality?

share|improve this question
    
is there a pattern to the books "he should have access to" - like only his own? only one's he's paid for? –  AD7six Jan 12 '13 at 23:25
    
The user should have access to the books that he has added into the system AND those that he has purchased. –  Joe Smith Jan 13 '13 at 12:24

2 Answers 2

Yes, ACL is overkill

ACL is a very powerful and flexible system - but it doesn't come free it brings with it complexity. Unless you have a usecase where you absolutely need fine-grained permissions (the two rules you've described do not fit this) - don't use ACL.

Restricting to books a user he has added

This rule is easy to implement - e.g. add to relevant find calls:

$results = $BookModelInstance->find('all', array(
    'conditions' => array(
        'created_by' => AuthComponent::user('id')
    )
));

Restricting to books a user he has bought

This rule is also easy to implement, thought slightly more involved:

$BookModelInstance->bindModel(array(
    'hasOne' => array( // Yes, hasOne not hasMany
        'MyPurchase' => array(
            'className' => 'Purchase',
            'foriegnKey' => 'user_id'
        ) 
    )
));
$results = $BookModelInstance->find('all', array(
    'recursive' => 0, // to join hasOne+belongsTo associations into the query
    'conditions' => array(
        'MyPurchase.user_id' = AuthComponent::user('id'),
    )
));

The bindModel call achieves the equivalent of SELECT .. FROM books LEFT JOIN book_users.. The conditions in the find call will therefore restrict results to books where there is a record of the user purchasing the book.

Putting them both together

A simplistic implementation of automatically applying both these rules would be:

model Book extends AppModel {

    public $actsAs = array('Containable');

    public $restrictToUser = true;


    public function beforeSave($options = array()) {
        if (!$this->id) {
           // Store who created this book
           $this->data[$this->alias]['created_by'] = AuthComponent::user('id');
        }
        return true;
    }

    public function beforeFind($queryData) {
        if (!$this->restrictToUser) {
            // we don't want to apply user-level restrictions
            return true;
        }

        $userId = AuthComponent::user('id');
        if (!$userId) {
            // we want to restrict to the current user - there isn't one.
            return false;
        }

        // define the association to the purchase table
        $this->bindModel(array(
            'hasOne' => array(
                'MyPurchase' => array(
                    'className' => 'Purchase',
                    'foriegnKey' => 'user_id'
                ) 
            )
        ));

        //ensure the purchase table is included in the current query
        $queryData['contain']['MyPurchase'] = array();

        // restrict to rows created by the current user, OR purchased by the current user
        $queryData['conditions']['OR'] = array(
            $this->alias '.created_by' => $userId,
            'MyPurchase.user_id' => $userId
        );
        return $queryData;
    }
}

This requires a field created_by (or equivalent) to be in the books table, and uses containable to ensure that the purchases table (or equivalent) is included in all relevant queries.

share|improve this answer

Most simple solution: Add a condition in your controller, so:

$this->set('books', $this->Book->find(
    'all',
    array('conditions' => array('Book.user_id' => $user['User']['id']))
);

Disadvantages: You will likely create duplicate code here since this check has to happen also in other places. Also when you start testing your model you can only test that it returns books, you cannot test a model method like: getMyBooks($userId). So no, not the preferred solution.

Next solution: Check in the model

It could be done by a check in for example your books model. You could just check in the afterfind() method whether the returned records are allowed or not. In your beforefind you could also add an additional condition to all queries.

In general a model should be fat so I would suggest implementing clear methods there like: getAllBooks, getBooksOfUser($User), getLatestBooksOfUser($User) etc.

Why is this a nice implementation? Because you now manage the access levels in a central place. You can test the model and you are sure it does only return books from this user.

With beforeSave etc. you can intervene every save attempt and first check: hey, you want to save this but is this really your book?

ACL solution

But in general it could be wise to implement some ACL solution (preferably the built in one) since that makes you application much more future proof. It allows flexibility, for example:

Each user may have access to a certain set of books. I don't need various roles.

That's true for now but the future can change it. So if you need a quick solution just custom filter the records. But think about the future.

share|improve this answer
    
Is there a specific reason to use beforefind() here? Couldn't we get by by setting a condition of books.user_id = $this->Auth->user...? –  Joe Smith Jan 13 '13 at 12:38
1  
Explained it in the answer, in short: No you cannot be sure that for example another developer just does a search for: $this->Book->find('all') and you are done. All books are published. So I would not trust that. –  Luc Franken Jan 13 '13 at 12:50

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