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I have a IQueryable object q of questions.

  DataClasses1DataContext dc = new DataClasses1DataContext();
        var q = from a in dc.GetTable<Questions>()
                select a ;

In question i have questionId and question.

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How can i loop through IQueryable data sequentially based on the next button click event so that i have the first question text as Lebel.Text and in my DropDown answers based on questionId, then after click next question i go to second question from IQueryable and continue like this until finish al questions?

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3 Answers 3

var enumerator = q.AsEnumerable().GetEnumerator();

In event handler:

if(enumerator.MoveNext())
{
      var question = enumerator.Current;
}
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1  
Current is property, not method. Just in case. –  Ilya Ivanov Jan 12 '13 at 14:54
    
@IlyaIvanov My mistake. Thanks. –  Hamlet Hakobyan Jan 12 '13 at 14:55
ctor()
{
    DataClasses1DataContext dc = new DataClasses1DataContext();
    var q = from a in dc.GetTable<Questions>()
            select a;
    _questionEnumerator = q.GetEnumerator();
}

void btn_click(object sender, EventArgs args)
{
    if (_questionEnumerator.MoveNext())
    {
        var row = _questionEnumerator.Current;
        // do stuff
    }    
}
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Usually, it is a bad practice to use directly the Enumerator.

If you need to get the questions on-the-fly, make a database request each time user presses the button:

Question question;

using (dataContext = new DataClasses1DataContext())
    question = dataContext.GetTable<Questions>().Skip(questionIndex).First();

If you need can hold all the questions in memory, just project them all to your application's memory:

IList<Question> questions;

using (dataContext = new DataClasses1DataContext())
    questions = dataContext.GetTable<Questions>().ToList();

Also, it is a bad pracite to keep the SQL (or any other database) connection keep-alive more than its needed. There are dozens of reasons, one of the most popular is that table while reading inside the default C# transaction implementation can hold a lock on that table, rendering it unable to process other requests.

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