Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am wrapping up a python class deque to queue to make my code more readable:

from collections import deque

class Queue(deque):
    def enqueue(self,a):
        super(Queue, self).append(a)

    def dequeue(self,a):
        super(Queue, self).popleft(a)

My question is which one I should use here, self.append() or super(Queue, self).append(), Why?

share|improve this question
2  
Why don't you try it? One is clearly the correct answer. –  Hunter McMillen Jan 12 '13 at 15:05
    
super points to the parent class, but the self points to this class. you cannot compare those keywords –  pylover Jan 12 '13 at 15:06
    
I tried to use it but it's fine in both case so I want to know if there is any difference between them. –  dorafmon Jan 12 '13 at 15:07
    
Both options are possible - as long as you know the right syntax. Your usage of super makes no sense....read the super() documentation. –  Andreas Jung Jan 12 '13 at 15:07
    
exactly both the options are possible. have you tried before posting? –  user1176501 Jan 12 '13 at 15:59

4 Answers 4

Given these two choices, you should use self.append, because your code using super is not valid Python.

The correct alternate version would be super(Queue, self).append.

share|improve this answer
    
Is there any difference on these two methods? –  dorafmon Jan 12 '13 at 15:06

Go for self (putting aside that your use of super is incorrect as Borealid stated).

However, I believe that in this case it's better to not extend deque, but rather wrap it.

from collections import deque

class Queue(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.q = deque

    def enqueue(self, a):
        return self.q.append(a)

    def dequeue(self, a):
        return self.q.popleft(a)

Also, note the returns - in your code they are missing and you cannot get the dequeued value.

share|improve this answer
    
Why is that case? –  dorafmon Jan 12 '13 at 15:08
    
It's usually better to use composition (my example), rather than inheritance (your example). It's much more simple. Also, in your case the details (read: methods) or deque will leak to your class and the abstraction won't be as nice. –  Emil Ivanov Jan 12 '13 at 15:09
1  
Generally saying composition is better than inheritance? –  dorafmon Jan 12 '13 at 15:11
    
@dorafmon: most of the time, yes. –  Emil Ivanov Jan 12 '13 at 15:12
    
May I ask why is this? Sorry I am a beginner and not very good at OOP –  dorafmon Jan 12 '13 at 15:15

super() is used to call a base class method that is redefined in the derived class. If your class were defining append() and popleft() methods extending their behavior, it would be reasonable to use super() inside append() and popleft(). However, your example redefines nothing from deque, so there is no need for super().

The following example shows when super() is used:

class Queue(deque):
    def append(self, a):
        # Now you explicitly call a method from base class
        # Otherwise you will make a recursive call
        super(Queue, self).append(a)
        print "Append!!!"

However, in case of multiple inheritance what super() does is more complicated than just allowing to call a method from base class. Detailed understanding requires understanding MRO (method resolution order). As a result, even in the example above it is usually better to write:

class Queue(deque):
    def append(self, a):
        # Now you explicitly call a method from base class
        # Otherwise you will make a recursive call
        deque.append(self, a)
        print "Append!!!"
share|improve this answer

Who told you it was a good idea to even think of using super instead of self? You want to affect a single instance of the Queue, not append a to the module scope (never mind the fact that super.append throws AttributeError)

from collections import deque

class Queue(deque):
    def enqueue(self, a):
        self.append(a)

    def dequeue(self, a):
        self.popleft(a)
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.