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I am trying to use quickcheck to generate random arguments of a given function (assuming all its types have Arbitrary instance and Show instance) along with the evaluation of the function at those arguments. I just need to print the values of arguments and evaluated answer afterwards. So I expect a function with following type

randomEvaluate :: Testable a => a -> IO ( [String] -- arguments
                                        , String ) -- Answer after evaluating
                                                   -- IO is just needed to get a new random number generator. If I pass a generator then I think probably I will not need IO here. 

I am still not sure about the type here but I think Testable a would do. I am still unable to actually get what I need. I am all confused in the mess of quickcheck datatypes Rose, Result etc.

UPDATE

Suppose I have a function

add :: Int -> Int -> Int
add a b = a+b

Then I assume a behavior like

> randomEvaluate add
(["1","3"],"4")

where 1 and 3 are random values generated for Int and 4 is f 1 3.

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2 Answers 2

I don’t think that you can use much of the QuickCheck code besides the modules Test.QuickCheck.Arbitrary and Test.QuickCheck.Gen.

One parameter only

Here is some simple code that provides what you need for functions with one argument only:

import Test.QuickCheck.Arbitrary
import Test.QuickCheck.Gen
import System.Random

randomEvaluate :: (Arbitrary a, Show a, Show b) => (a -> b) -> IO (String, String)
randomEvaluate f = do
    stdGen <- newStdGen
    let x = unGen arbitrary stdGen 1000
    let y = f x
    return (show x, show y)

And here you can see it in action:

*Main> randomEvaluate (\(a,b) -> a + b)
("(-292,-655)","-947")
*Main> randomEvaluate (\(a,b) -> a + b)
("(586,-905)","-319")
*Main> randomEvaluate (\(a,b) -> a + b)
("(547,-72)","475")

As you can see it is possible to use it with functions with more than one argument if you uncurry it. If that is not sufficient things become a little bit more difficult, but should be posssible with some type class trickery.

Multiple parameters, return type marked explicitly

Here is an approach that requires “only” to wrap the return value of the function in a newtype. (This might be avoidable with non-Haskell98-features):

class RandEval a where
    randomEvaluate :: StdGen -> a -> ([String], String)

newtype Ret a = Ret a

instance Show a => RandEval (Ret a)  where
    randomEvaluate _ (Ret x) = ([], show x)

instance (Show a, Arbitrary a, RandEval b) => RandEval (a -> b) where
    randomEvaluate stdGen f = (show x : args, ret)
        where (stdGen1, stdGen2) = split stdGen
              x = unGen arbitrary stdGen1 1000
              (args, ret) = randomEvaluate stdGen2 (f x) 

doRandomEvaluate :: RandEval a => a -> IO ([String], String)
doRandomEvaluate f = do
    stdGen <- newStdGen
    return $ randomEvaluate stdGen f

See it in action here:

*Main> doRandomEvaluate (\a b -> Ret (a && b))
(["False","True"],"False")
*Main> doRandomEvaluate (\a b -> Ret (a + b))
(["944","758"],"1702")
*Main> doRandomEvaluate (\a b c -> Ret (a + b + c))
(["-274","413","865"],"1004")
*Main> doRandomEvaluate (\a b c d -> Ret (a + b + c + d))
(["-61","-503","-704","-877"],"-2145")

Multiple parameters with language extensions

If it is also undesirable to have to explicitly mark the return value, this works, but uses language extensions:

{-# LANGUAGE FlexibleInstances, UndecidableInstances, OverlappingInstances #-}

import Test.QuickCheck.Arbitrary
import Test.QuickCheck.Gen
import System.Random
import Control.Arrow

class RandEval a where
    randomEvaluate :: StdGen -> a -> ([String], String)

instance (Show a, Arbitrary a, RandEval b) => RandEval (a -> b) where
    randomEvaluate stdGen f = first (show x:) $ randomEvaluate stdGen2 (f x) 
        where (stdGen1, stdGen2) = split stdGen
              x = unGen arbitrary stdGen1 1000

instance Show a => RandEval a where
    randomEvaluate _ x = ([], show x)

doRandomEvaluate :: RandEval a => a -> IO ([String], String)
doRandomEvaluate f = do
    stdGen <- newStdGen
    return $ randomEvaluate stdGen f

And here is the original use case from the posting:

*Main> doRandomEvaluate ( (+) :: Int -> Int -> Int )
(["-5998437593420471249","339001240294599646"],"-5659436353125871603")

But now you are at the whims of how GHC resolves overlapping instances. E.g. even with this nice (but also non-Haskell98) instance to show boolean functions:

type BoolFun a = Bool -> a

instance Show a => Show (BoolFun a) where
    show f = "True -> " ++ show (f True) ++ ", False -> " ++ show (f False)

aBoolFun :: Bool -> BoolFun Bool
aBoolFun x y = x && y

you do not see this instance in use in doRandomEvaluate:

*Main> doRandomEvaluate aBoolFun 
    (["False","False"],"False")

With the original solution, you do:

*Main> doRandomEvaluate (Ret . aBoolFun)
(["False"],"True -> False, False -> False")
*Main> doRandomEvaluate (Ret . aBoolFun)
(["True"],"True -> True, False -> False")

A warning

But note that this is a slippery slope. A small change to the code above, and it stops working in GHC 7.6.1 (but still works in GHC 7.4.1):

instance (Show a, Arbitrary a, RandEval b) => RandEval (a -> b) where
    randomEvaluate stdGen f = (show x:args, ret)
        where (stdGen1, stdGen2) = split stdGen
              x = unGen arbitrary stdGen1 1000
              (args, ret) = randomEvaluate stdGen2 (f x) 

SPJ explains why this is not really a bug – to me a clear sign that this approach is pushing the type class hackery a bit too far.

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I also came up with a similar code for single argument functions but I want it for multiple argument functions. –  Satvik Jan 12 '13 at 16:58
    
I don't want to define my own type class (because then It would be too much pain to define instances for many data types but I maybe wrong here). –  Satvik Jan 12 '13 at 17:01
    
I feel like using CoArbitrary can help but still I am not sure. –  Satvik Jan 12 '13 at 17:35
    
I updated my code with a typeclass. Note that you do not have to define instances; the two instances given in my code are all you need. They use the existing arbitrary instances. –  Joachim Breitner Jan 12 '13 at 18:06
    
Thanks. That looks good but I am afraid I dont have control over what functions are passed to this except the Arbitrary constraint I mentioned. Can you please elaborate on how to do this with non-haskell 98 features. –  Satvik Jan 12 '13 at 18:18

QuickCheck is stunningly simple:

Prelude> import Test.QuickCheck

A simple driver function is provided:

Prelude Test.QuickCheck> :t quickCheck
quickCheck :: Testable prop => prop -> IO ()

So define something that has a type found in 'Testable':

Prelude Test.QuickCheck> let prop_commut a b = a + b == b + a
Prelude Test.QuickCheck> :t prop_commut
prop_commut :: (Eq a, Num a) => a -> a -> Bool

And run it:

Prelude Test.QuickCheck> quickCheck prop_commut 
+++ OK, passed 100 tests.

For a fuller treatment see RWH

share|improve this answer
1  
I am not trying to check a property. Maybe I was not clear. Suppose I have a function f a b = a + b (assuming f to be of type Int -> Int -> Int). I expect a function like ranEval f to produce something like (["1","2"],"3") where 1 and 2 are random values generated for Int and 3 is the output after evaluating f on those. –  Satvik Jan 12 '13 at 15:39
    
I have updated the question. –  Satvik Jan 12 '13 at 15:43

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