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I am trying to run the following simple code but keep getting:

libc++abi.dylib: terminate called throwing an exception

Could some please explain to me what this means?

Code:

int main()
{
    ifstream in;
    cout << "Enter name: ";
    string s = GetLine();
    in.open(s.c_str());
    if (in.fail())
        Error("Error your file was not found");
    return 0;
}

Error comes from the following:

ErrorException::ErrorException(string m="unspecified custom error") 
: msg(m) {
}

ErrorException::~ErrorException() throw() {}

const char* ErrorException::what() const throw() {
return this->msg.c_str(); 
}

void Error(string str) {
    ErrorException err(str);
    throw err;
}

I should be getting back the error message that I specified, but I don't; can anyone see why?

share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by Kerrek SB, WhozCraig, sashoalm, Bo Persson, BЈовић Jan 12 '13 at 20:01

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

3  
What does this have to do with your question title? –  Oliver Charlesworth Jan 12 '13 at 16:53
    
What do you mean by "getting back the error message"? Where are you expecting the error message to go? –  David Schwartz Jan 12 '13 at 17:03

1 Answer 1

You throw an exception you don't catch. That terminates the program. You have no code to receive the error message, print it, or do anything like that. If you want to catch the exception, use a try/catch block. In the catch portion, you can do whatever you want with the error message.

Try something like:

int main()
{
    ifstream in;
    cout << "Enter name: ";
    string s = GetLine();
    try
    {
       in.open(s.c_str());
       if (in.fail())
           Error("Error your file was not found");
    }
    catch (ErrorException& e)
    {
       cerr << e.what() << endl;
    }
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I was expecting that if it couldnt find the file, it would tell the user "Error your file was not found". –  Benjamin R C Bell Jan 12 '13 at 17:10
1  
@BenjaminRCBell: What is the "it" that you were thinking would tell the user something? Your code doesn't contain anything that would tell the user that. (And how would it tell the user anything? How does it know how to reach the user? Should it pop up a window? Send an email? Write to stderr? Or what?) –  David Schwartz Jan 12 '13 at 17:11
    
Just to return the default error or my specified error msg to the console. This code is from an online university course. The error function was rewritten by someone trying to reconstitute the header package provided by the University (no longer available online). These headers are provided to aid students in the learning process without dealing with certain things that tend to be more complex. When I say it I guess I am referring to in.open(s.c_str()); –  Benjamin R C Bell Jan 12 '13 at 17:28
    
@BenjaminRCBell: Nothing has any idea that it's an error message or that it should be sent to the console. The compiler knows there's a function called what that returns that string. But there's no code anywhere to suggest that it would be useful to output that string to the console. If you want it, you need to write it. There is nothing magical about naming a method what. You still have to call it if you want it to be invoked. –  David Schwartz Jan 12 '13 at 17:29

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