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typedef struct tape
{
    char symbol;
    struct tape *next;
    struct tape *prev;
}tape;

tape *pt;

void ShowCurrentCombination()
{
    tape currentNode;


    currentNode = *pt;
    while(pt->prev != NULL)
            pt=pt->prev;

    while(pt->next != NULL)
        {
            if(pt == &currentNode) //this is never true :( 
            putc("[q]",stdout); 

            putc(pt->symbol,stdout);
                pt=pt->next;
        }
    putc(pt->symbol,stdout);
}

This function should show the content of list marking the current element by "[q]" at it's left side. Unfortunately, only the plain data is shown. Why?

For sake of completeness, let me introduce the function that initializes the list:

void GenerateInputTape(int n)
{
    int i;

    pt=(tape*)malloc(sizeof(tape));

    pt->symbol='B';

    pt->prev=NULL;
    pt->next=(tape*)malloc(sizeof(tape));
    pt->next->prev = pt;
    pt=pt->next;

    for(i=0;i<2*n+1;i++)
    {   
        if(i < (2*n/2))
            pt->symbol='0';
        else
            pt->symbol='1';


        pt->next=(tape*)malloc(sizeof(tape));
        pt->next->prev = pt;
        pt=pt->next;
    }

    pt->symbol='B';
    pt->next=NULL;
}
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

When you check pt == &currentNode you check if pt points to currentNode. This never happens, since currentNode is not even in the list (no element in the list points to it).

You want currentNode not to be a copy, but pointer equal to pt at the beginning of function.

tape *currentNode;
currentNode = pt;
...
if(pt == currentNode)

You also don't check the last element.

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Nothing has changed. I've also tried this approach before. –  0x6B6F77616C74 Jan 12 '13 at 17:30
1  
@0x6B6F77616C74, perhaps pt points to last element? –  zch Jan 12 '13 at 17:37

Note the relation between

currentNode = *pt;

and

if(pt == &currentNode)

In the first, you have initialized currentNode with the contents of what the pointer pt points to. In the second, you are checking if the address of currentNode is the same as that of some member in the list (pointed to by pt). It should be clear why this can never be true.

What you need to do is to save the address, i.e. the pointer, not its contents

tape *currentNodePointer = pt;

and later

if(pt == currentNodePointer)

(Your code could be organized better to obviate having always to "rewind" to the head of the list, but that's for another day perhaps.)

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