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I'm working with a very large sparse matrix multiplication (matmul) problem. As an example let's say:

  • A is a binary ( 75 x 200,000 ) matrix. It's sparse, so I'm using csc for storage. I need to do the following matmul operation:

  • B = A.transpose() * A

  • The output is going to be a sparse and symmetric matrix of size 200Kx200K.

Unfortunately, B is going to be way to large to store in RAM (or "in core") on my laptop. On the other hand, I'm lucky because there are some properties to B that should solve this problem.

Since B is going to be symmetric along the diagonal and sparse, I could use a triangular matrix (upper/lower) to store the results of the matmul operation and a sparse matrix storage format could further reduce the size.

My question is...can numpy or scipy be told, ahead of time, what the output storage requirements are going to look like so that I can select a storage solution using numpy and avoid the "matrix is too big" runtime error after several minutes (hours) of calculation?

In other words, can storage requirements for the matrix multiply be approximated by analyzing the contents of the two input matrices using an approximate counting algorithm?

If not, I'm looking into a brute force solution. Something involving map/reduce, out-of-core storage, or a matmul subdivision solution (strassens algorithm) from the following web links:

A couple Map/Reduce problem subdivision solutions

A out-of-core (PyTables) storage solution

A matmul subdivision solution:

Thanks in advance for any recommendations, comments, or guidance!

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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Since you are after the product of a matrix with its transpose, the value at [m, n] is basically going to be the dot product of columns m and n in your original matrix.

I am going to use the following matrix as a toy example

a = np.array([[0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1],
              [0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 1, 0],
              [0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1]])
>>> np.dot(a.T, a)
array([[0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
       [0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 1, 0],
       [0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1],
       [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
       [0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1],
       [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
       [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
       [0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 1, 0],
       [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
       [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
       [0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 1, 0],
       [0, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 2]])

It is of shape (3, 12) and has 7 non-zero entries. The product of its transpose with it is of course of shape (12, 12) and has 16 non-zero entries, 6 of it in the diagonal, so it only requires storage of 11 elements.

You can get a good idea of what the size of your output matrix is going to be in one of two ways:

CSR FORMAT

If your original matrix has C non-zero columns, your new matrix will have at most C**2 non-zero entries, of which C are in the diagonal, and are assured not to be zero, and of the remaining entries you only need to keep half, so that is at most (C**2 + C) / 2 non-zero elements. Of course, many of these will also be zero, so this is probably a gross overestimate.

If your matrix is stored in csr format, then the indices attribute of the corresponding scipy object has an array with the column indices of all non zero elements, so you can easily compute the above estimate as:

>>> a_csr = scipy.sparse.csr_matrix(a)
>>> a_csr.indices
array([ 2, 11,  1,  7, 10,  4, 11])
>>> np.unique(a_csr.indices).shape[0]
6

So there are 6 columns with non-zero entries, and so the estimate would be for at most 36 non-zero entries, way more than the real 16.

CSC FORMAT

If instead of column indices of non-zero elements we have row indices, we can actually do a better estimate. For the dot product of two columns to be non-zero, they must have a non-zero element in the same row. If there are R non-zero elements in a given row, they will contribute R**2 non-zero elements to the product. When you sum this for all rows, you are bound to count some elements more than once, so this is also an upper bound.

The row indices of the non-zero elements of your matrix are in the indices attribute of a sparse csc matrix, so this estimate can be computed as follows:

>>> a_csc = scipy.sparse.csc_matrix(a)
>>> a_csc.indices
array([1, 0, 2, 1, 1, 0, 2])
>>> rows, where = np.unique(a_csc.indices, return_inverse=True)
>>> where = np.bincount(where)
>>> rows
array([0, 1, 2])
>>> where
array([2, 3, 2])
>>> np.sum(where**2)
17

This is darn close to the real 16! And it is actually not a coincidence that this estimate is actually the same as:

>>> np.sum(np.dot(a.T,a),axis=None)
17

In any case, the following code should allow you to see that the estimation is pretty good:

def estimate(a) :
    a_csc = scipy.sparse.csc_matrix(a)
    _, where = np.unique(a_csc.indices, return_inverse=True)
    where = np.bincount(where)
    return np.sum(where**2)

def test(shape=(10,1000), count=100) :
    a = np.zeros(np.prod(shape), dtype=int)
    a[np.random.randint(np.prod(shape), size=count)] = 1
    print 'a non-zero = {0}'.format(np.sum(a))
    a = a.reshape(shape)
    print 'a.T * a non-zero = {0}'.format(np.flatnonzero(np.dot(a.T,
                                                                a)).shape[0])
    print 'csc estimate = {0}'.format(estimate(a))

>>> test(count=100)
a non-zero = 100
a.T * a non-zero = 1065
csc estimate = 1072
>>> test(count=200)
a non-zero = 199
a.T * a non-zero = 4056
csc estimate = 4079
>>> test(count=50)
a non-zero = 50
a.T * a non-zero = 293
csc estimate = 294
share|improve this answer
    
apologies for the delay. thank you for the assistance! i was concerned the phrase "storage requirements" was vague. the estimation code you sent over was exactly what i was hoping to learn. is your method inspired by some of the analytic combinatorics/asymptotics work sedgewick and flajolet had been doing (with respect to approximate counts)? references: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Analytic_combinatorics algo.inria.fr/flajolet/Publications/AnaCombi en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asymptotic_theory en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Approximate_counting_algorithm –  ct_ Mar 1 '13 at 3:09
    
@ct. Unfortunately I live in a land far, far away from academia, so I had never heard of any of the stuff you linked. My inspiration was simply the description of the CSR and CSC formats. –  Jaime Mar 1 '13 at 4:50
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