Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Imagine this class:

public class ObjectCreator<T> {
    private Class<T> persistentClass;

    public ObjectCreator(Class<T> persistentClass) {
        this.persistentClass = persistentClass;
    }

    public T create() {
        T instance = null;
        try {
            instance = persistentClass.newInstance();
        } catch (Exception e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        } 

        return instance;
    }
}

Now I sublclass it with a domain object:

public class PersonCreator extends ObjectCreator<Person>{

    /**
     * @param persistentClass
     */
    public PersonCreator() {
        super(Person.class);

    }

}

All works great... But if I try to subclass it with a another generic domain object the compiler complains:

public class MessageCreator extends ObjectCreator<Message<String>>{

    /**
     * @param persistentClass
     */
    public MessageCreator() {
        super(Message.class);
    }

}

The constructor ObjectCreator<Message<String>>(Class<Message>) is undefined MessageCreator.java

I think that this is a big limit: why is this forbidden?

Any idea how to work around?

Massimo

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Try this:

super((Class<Message<String>>) ((Object) Message.class)); //compiles with warning

It will be even better if you'll change constructor of base class to

public ObjectCreator(Class<? extends T> persistentClass)

and then use this in derrived classes:

super(new Message<String>(){}.getClass()); //compiles without warning

It will compile without warnings

EDIT

According to definition of getClass() http://docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/lang/Object.html#getClass()

Returns Class<? extends X>, where X is the erasure of the static type of the expression on which getClass is called. Which means getClass() will return Class<? extends Message> for new Message<String>() and Class<? extends Message<String>> for anonymous class new Message<String>(){}

share|improve this answer
    
Unless Message is final or has an inaccessible default constructor. –  Paul Bellora Jan 12 '13 at 18:47
    
@PaulBellora yes, this is a known limitation of this approach. However I don't see any other workarounds that will compile without warning. –  Dmitry Zaitsev Jan 12 '13 at 18:49
    
That's the best solution I think. One question: which is the difference between new Message<String>() and new Message<String>(){}? –  Massimo Ugues Jan 13 '13 at 12:55
    
@MassimoUgues new Message<String>(){} will create an anonymous subclass of Message<String>. See detailed explanation above. –  Dmitry Zaitsev Jan 13 '13 at 13:14
1  
The problem with the anonymous class approach is that this will in fact create instances of this very anonymous class in the create method - which is not likely what you want. More-over in other scenarios (like serialization rather than deserialization) an "instanceof" check is going to fail because it will only recognize the anonymous subclass, but not "raw" Message<String> - classes or other classes implementing Message<String>. So although this is the only simple way to compile without a warning, it should be taken with a grain of salt, because it might not behave the way you expect it to. –  Sebastian Jan 13 '13 at 16:48

There is no '.class' variant for generic classes - the information is not available at runtime, hovewever in order to make the above code compile, you can simply cast the expression to the required type.

super ((Class<Message<String>>)((Class<?>)Message.class));

Note that this will not make the information available at runtime either (i.e. for reflection, etc.), however it should compile with an unchecked warning - which is just that - a warning.

share|improve this answer
    
That does not compile. –  assylias Jan 12 '13 at 18:09
2  
super ((Class<Message<String>>)((Class<?>)Message.class)); this does –  Leonidos Jan 12 '13 at 18:17
    
Sorry, I did not check my answer, first - Leonidos is correct - you first need to cast the Message.class to Class<?>and then do the required cast. Updated my answer. –  Sebastian Jan 12 '13 at 18:21

It works if you just use

public class MessageCreator extends ObjectCreator<Message>{

    /**
     * @param persistentClass
     */
    public MessageCreator() {
        super(Message.class);
    }

}

This creates the correct object but still will give a warning for the class definition and if you do

Message<String> m = creator.create();
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.