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I'm trying to read some integers from a file. The program compiles with no errors but it doesn't print the integers.

int main(int argc,char *argv[]){
if(argc != 2){
    printf("Use %s file_name", argv[0]);
}
else{
    char file_name[255];
    int df,n=0,v[1000],tmp,i;
    strcpy(file_name,argv[1]);
    df=open(file_name,O_RDONLY);
    while(read(df,tmp,sizeof(n))>0){
        v[n++] = tmp;
    }
    for(i=0;i<n;i++){
        printf("%d ",v[i]);
    }
}
return 0;}

new code :

 int main(int argc,char *argv[]){
if(argc != 2){
printf("Use %s file_name", argv[0]);
}
else{
char file_name[255];
int df,n=0,v[1000],tmp,i;
strcpy(file_name,argv[1]);
if ((df=open(file_name,O_RDONLY) ) < 0) {
perror("Cannot open output file\n"); exit(1);
}
while( n != 1000 && ( read(df,&v[n++],sizeof(*v)) > 0) ){}
for(i=0; i!=n; i++){
printf("%c ",(char)v[i]);
}
}
return 0;
}

even before it only showed 2 of those bit patterns instead of 3 even though i have 3 characters in my file

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closed as too localized by sashoalm, Jesus Ramos, Ed Heal, Bohemian, Joe Jan 13 '13 at 16:17

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
One thing you need to do when asking questions here is to be clear on the one hand that this is a homework assignment, and on the other hand make sure you list all the info, rules you have to follow for the assignment. –  Robert S. Barnes Jan 12 '13 at 18:47

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Read takes a pointer to buffer as it's second arg:

int main(int argc,char *argv[]){
if(argc != 2){
    printf("Use %s file_name", argv[0]);
}
else{
    char file_name[255];
    int df,n=0,v[1000],tmp,i;
    strcpy(file_name,argv[1]);
    if ((df=open(file_name,O_RDONLY) ) < 0) {
    perror("Cannot open output file\n"); exit(1);
    }
    while( n != 1000 && ( read(df,&v[n++],sizeof(*v)) > 0) ){}
    for(i=0; i!=n; i++){
        printf("%d ",v[i]);
    }
}
return 0;
}

I'm actually surprised your program didn't segfault - you're using an uninitialized int as a pointer value. You need to check if the file was succesfully opened. You also need to make sure you don't overflow your buffer, so you need to check n on each iteration. Also, there's no need to use a temp variable, you can write directly into your buffer.

share|improve this answer
    
ok now it seems to work but it's not printing what's in the file. it's printing some random big numbers –  Adrian Jan 12 '13 at 18:07
    
@Adrian Are your "numbers" in text? if not, are they in the same bit-depth and endian format in both the writer of the file and the reader of the file? –  WhozCraig Jan 12 '13 at 18:10
    
Using the value as a pointer is undefined behaviour, so there's no saying what may happen. –  Joachim Pileborg Jan 12 '13 at 18:11
    
i just made a new file and wrote "8 2 9" in it ( without the quotes ) –  Adrian Jan 12 '13 at 18:12
    
Those are characters, not integers. –  Robert S. Barnes Jan 12 '13 at 18:17

read takes a void* so you need to pass the address of the variable you want to use to store the values

try this

int main(int argc,char *argv[]){
    if(argc != 2){
        printf("Use %s file_name", argv[0]);
    }
    else{
        char file_name[255];
        int df,n=0,v[1000],tmp,i;
        strcpy(file_name,argv[1]);
        df=open(file_name,O_RDONLY);
        while(read(df,&tmp,sizeof(n))>0){
            v[n++] = tmp;
        }
        for(i=0;i<n;i++){
            printf("%d ",v[i]);
        }
    }
    return 0;
}

I just changed temp by &temp

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