Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I am using Bottle for uploading rather large files. The idea is that when the file is uploaded, the web app run (and forget) a system command with the uploaded file-path as an argument. Except for starting the system command with the correct file-path as an argument I do not need to save the file, but I need to be certain that the file will be available until the process completes the processing.

I use the exact code described here: http://bottlepy.org/docs/dev/tutorial.html#post-form-data-and-file-uploads

My questions are:

  • Do bottle store uploaded file in memory or on a specific place on the disk (or perhaps like Flask, a bit of both)?
  • Will the uploaded file be directly available to other tools without .read() and then manually saving the bytes to a specified file on disk?
  • What would be the best way to start the system command with the file as an argument? Is it possible to just pass the path to an existing file directly?
share|improve this question
up vote 14 down vote accepted

Ok, let's break this down.

The full code is:

HTML:

<form action="/upload" method="post" enctype="multipart/form-data">
  <input type="text" name="name" />
  <input type="file" name="data" />
</form>

PYTHON CODE:

from bottle import route, request
@route('/upload', method='POST')
def do_upload():
    name = request.forms.name
    data = request.files.data
    if name and data and data.file:
        raw = data.file.read() # This is dangerous for big files
        filename = data.filename
        return "Hello %s! You uploaded %s (%d bytes)." % (name, filename, len(raw))
    return "You missed a field."

(From the doc's you provided)

So, first of all, we can see that we first pull the information from the name and the data in the html form, and assign them to the variables name and data. Thats pretty straight forward. However, next we assign the variable raw to data.file.read(). This is basically taking all of the file uploaded into the variable raw. This being said, the entire file is in memory, which is why they put "This is dangerous for big files" as a comment next to the line.

This being said, if you wanted to save the file out to disk, you could do so (but be careful) using something like:

with open(filename,'w') as open_file:
    open_file.write(data.file.read())

As for your other questions:

1."What would be the best way to start the system command with the file as an argument? Is it possible to just pass the path to an existing file directly?"

You should see the subprocess module, specifically Popen: http://docs.python.org/2/library/subprocess.html#popen-constructor

2."Will the uploaded file be directly available to other tools without .read() and then manually saving the bytes to a specified file on disk?"

Yes, you can pass the file data around without saving it to disk, however, be warned that memory consumption is something to watch. However, if these "tools" are not in python, you may be dealing with pipes or subprocesses to pass the data to these "tools".

share|improve this answer
    
The data.file.read() is interesting... I could probably read it in chunks (to avoid the "dangerous" aspect). So I guess the conclusion really is that its stored in memory and that I have to manually store it to file before processing it. – agnsaft Jan 13 '13 at 0:54
    
If anyone wants to understand where request.forms and request.files are coming from in Bottle and why they are different, see these two links resp. bottlepy.org/docs/dev/api.html#bottle.BaseRequest.forms and bottlepy.org/docs/dev/api.html#bottle.BaseRequest.files – user1063287 Jan 18 '14 at 7:52
    
How do you read it in chunks? – Jeff Apr 2 '14 at 21:09
    
AJAX the form: stackoverflow.com/a/28024824/844700 – The Demz Jan 23 '15 at 10:16
 with open(filename,'w') as open_file:
    open_file.write(data.file.read())

dont work

you can use

data = request.files.data
data.save(Path,overwrite=True)
share|improve this answer

The file will be handled by the routine you use. That means your read handles the connection (the file should not be there, according to wsgi spec)

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.