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Maybe it will sound a bit weird, but i actually know a solution for this problem. My initial solution didn't work and i actually want to why. It is an Asp.Net MVC application.

This didn't work:

        public static DateTime ConvertToUTC(String userTimeZone, DateTime date)
    {
        var result = TimeZoneInfo.ConvertTimeToUtc(date, TimeZoneInfo.FindSystemTimeZoneById(userTimeZone));

        return result;
    }

    public static DateTime ConvertToUserTime(string userTimeZone, DateTime date)
    {
        var result = TimeZoneInfo.ConvertTimeFromUtc(date, TimeZoneInfo.FindSystemTimeZoneById(userTimeZone));

        return result;
    }

I couldn't convert the time back to it's original time.

This did work:

public DateTime ConvertToUTC(String userTimeZone, DateTime date)
    {

        var result = TimeZoneInfo.ConvertTimeToUtc(result, TimeZoneInfo.FindSystemTimeZoneById(userTimeZone));

        return result;
    }

    public DateTime ConvertToUserTime(string userTimeZone, DateTime date)
    {
        var userTimezoneInfo = TimeZoneInfo.FindSystemTimeZoneById(userTimeZone);
        var result = date.Add(userTimezoneInfo.BaseUtcOffset);

        return result;
    }

Does anybody have an idea?

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3  
It's very hard to know what's going wrong without any idea of the time zone involved, the input, the expected output or the actual output when it failed. I would suggest using my Noda Time project instead, mind you :) –  Jon Skeet Jan 12 '13 at 19:18

1 Answer 1

For this problem a special DataType is introduced in .NET 3.5: DateTimeOffset it is functionally similar to DateTime but it stores also a UTC offset.

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