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I want to generate a list of the dates in yyyy-mm-dd format for every Monday and Saturday in a given year using Python's calendar module (or something else if it's a better fit, but I'd prefer not to have to bring in an outside library).

However, functions that give you data for the entire year like calendar.calendar() just output a calendar in string format, which, needless to say, would be unreasonably burdensome to work with.

What I want is something like calendar.monthcalendar, which returns a matrix with 7 entries for each list, each representing an ordered day of the week. This, however, is also burdensome for my Monday and Saturday problem, because some weeks span 2 months (i.e., end and beginning of the month).

I suppose I could develop an awkward hack to work through that, but I'm hoping there is a better way I'm overlooking.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

IIUC, you can simply use datetime:

>>> year = 2013
>>> days = [datetime.datetime(year, 1, 1) + datetime.timedelta(days=i) for i in range(366)]
>>> days = [day for day in days if day.year == year and day.weekday() in (0, 5)]
>>> formatted = [day.strftime("%Y-%m-%d") for day in days]
>>> len(formatted)
104
>>> formatted[:10]
['2013-01-05', '2013-01-07', '2013-01-12', '2013-01-14', '2013-01-19', '2013-01-21', '2013-01-26', '2013-01-28', '2013-02-02', '2013-02-04']
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Although it's a external dependency, dateutil has exactly the functionality you search via it rrule module.

>>> import datetime
>>> import dateutil.rrule as rr
>>> year = 2013
>>> mondays_saturdays = rr.rrule(rr.DAILY,
...                              dtstart=datetime.datetime(year, 1, 1),
...                              until=datetime.datetime(year, 12, 31),
...                              byweekday=(rr.MO, rr.SA)
... )
>>> print len(list(mondays_saturdays))
104
>>> print list(mondays_saturdays)[:5]
[datetime.datetime(2013, 1, 5, 0, 0), datetime.datetime(2013, 1, 7, 0, 0), datetime.datetime(2013, 1, 12, 0, 0), datetime.datetime(2013, 1, 14, 0, 0), datetime.datetime(2013, 1, 19, 0, 0)]
>>> 
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+1: this is the right approach if the OP can use external modules. –  DSM Jan 12 '13 at 22:54

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