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I have tried to return the array name as shown below. Basically I am trying to make the function test return an array that can be used in main. Could you advise me as to what I need to read into more to find out how to perform a function like this?

#include <stdio.h>

int test(int size, int x){
    int factorFunction[size];    
    factorFunction[0] = 5 + x;
    factorFunction[1] = 7 + x;
    factorFunction[2] = 9 + x;
    return factorFunction;
}

int main(void){
    int factors[2];
    factors = test(2, 3);
    printf("%d", factors[1]);
    return 0;
}

I receive the compiler errors:

smallestMultiple.c:8: warning: return makes integer from pointer without a cast
smallestMultiple.c:8: warning: function returns address of local variable
smallestMultiple.c: In function ‘main’:
smallestMultiple.c:13: error: incompatible types in assignment
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lots of great answers already. Just a quick note from me: remember that: factorFunction refers to "the address of the first (or 0th) element of your array." It is equivalent to &factorFunction[0] which translates to "the address of the 0th element." –  wpp Jan 12 '13 at 22:33
    
Hi Thanks for the comment! I understand this, I just intended to refer 1 to an actual number 1. Is it considered bad practice to disregard the 0th index? –  user1530249 Jan 12 '13 at 23:04
    
you should not disregard the 0th element! It takes some getting used to, but is essential (even for higher level languages like ruby). –  wpp Jan 13 '13 at 11:58

8 Answers 8

You will need to allocate memory on the heap and return a pointer. C cannot return arrays from functions.

int* test(int size, int x)
{
    int* factorFunction = malloc(sizeof(int) * size);    
    factorFunction[0] = 5 + x;
    factorFunction[1] = 7 + x;
    factorFunction[2] = 9 + x;
    return factorFunction;
}
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The first line of the error messages means exactly what it says: you've declared the function as returning an int, yet you try to return a pointer.
The bigger problem (as the second line of the error messages tells you) is that the array you're trying to return a pointer to is a local array, and will therefore go out of scope when the functions returns and no longer be valid.
What you ought to do is dynamically allocate an array (i.e. a chunk of continuous memory) using malloc or new and return a pointer to it. And of course make sure you free the memory once you're done with it.

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You can return an array by returning a pointer (arrays decays to pointers). However, that would be bad in your case, as then you would be returning a pointer to a local variable, and that results in undefined behaviour. This is because the memory the returned pointer points to is no longer valid after the function returns, as the stack space is now reused by other functions.

What you should do is to pass the array and its size both as arguments to the function.

You also have another problem in your code, and that is you use an array of size two, but write to a third element.

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Functions can't return arrays in C.

However, they can return structs. And structs can contain arrays...

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My suggestion would be to pass in an array to fill in:

void test(int size, int factors[], int x){
    factorFunction[0] = 5 + x;
    factorFunction[1] = 7 + x;
    factorFunction[2] = 9 + x;
}

int main(void){
    int factors[3];
    test(3, factors, 3);
    printf("%d", factors[1]);
    return 0;
}

With this method, you don't have to worry about allocating, and you don't need to free the array later on.

I also fixed up up the size of the array, so you don't write outside of it with the third element. Remember that C arrays are declared with "how many you want" and then indexed from 0 ... (how_many-1), so [2] on an array declared with [2] goes outside the array.

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Firstly, the array size should be constant in C. You can not use the statement below:

int factorFunction[size];

Secondly, you are trying to return an array created in the function which will be deleted out of the scope.

To avoid this, you can take an array as parameter in test function or create an array dynamically with malloc function. Btw your test function can return pointer to updated array.

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Not sure what std he is using,but C99 have VLA. –  Jack Jan 12 '13 at 19:51
    
Whats wrong with int factorFunction[size]? –  wpp Jan 12 '13 at 22:42
    
@sytycs Jack is right. We don't know what C standart he is using. I thought that he is using ANSI C because we were expected to write in ANSI C standart at school. As Jack mention variable-length arrays added in C99 standart. –  Gökhan Çoban Jan 13 '13 at 2:18

you are returning a pointer to the array, not the array itself, the compiler is telling you that (thats why he wants you to make a cast)

something like this

int* test( ...your  code...
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This is wrong, arrays and pointers are "interchangeable" in terms of return type (arrays decay into pointers when passed to and returned from functions), it's just that the function is declared to return int, but it tries to return an array. –  user529758 Jan 12 '13 at 19:43
#include <stdio.h>

#include <stdlib.h>

int* test(int size, int x){
    int *factorFunction = (int *) malloc(sizeof(int) * size);    
    if( factorFunction != NULL ) //makes sure malloc was successful
    {
        factorFunction[0] = 5 + x;
        factorFunction[1] = 7 + x;
        factorFunction[2] = 9 + x; //this line won't work because your array is only 2 ints long

    }
return factorFunction;
}

int main(void){
    int *factors;
    factors = test(2, 3);
    printf("%d", factors[1]);
    //just remember to free the variable back to the heap when you're done
    free(factors);
    return 0;
}

you also might want to make sure that the indexes you are setting actually exist in your array as I've noted above

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