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We have a web application and are using frameset for layout. (Example). But I read that frames have been deprecated and also based sites are not ADA compliant and nothing will get picked up by google or any other search engine as those systems will find only the page that sets up the frames and not the content in the frames themselves. So my question is that what are the alternatives to frames ? Thanks, Ravi

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2 Answers 2

Use div tags. Try something like this:

<div id="header">
    HEADER STUFFS
</div>
<div id="below-header">
    <div id="menu">
        MENU STUFFS
    </div>
    <div id="content">
        CONTENT STUFFS
    </div>
</div>

With the following CSS:

#header {
    height: HEADER HEIGHT;
}
#below-header {
    position: absolute;
    top: HEADER HEIGHT;
    right: 0;
    bottom: 0;
    left: 0;
}
    #menu {
        width: MENU WIDTH;
        position: absolute;
        top: 0;
        bottom: 0;
        left: 0;
    }
    #content {
        position: absolute;
        top: 0;
        right: 0;
        bottom: 0;
        left: MENU WIDTH;
    }

Of course replace to your own likings. You could use percentages for the widths and heights.

Then, the real challenge is how to load your content in the content-div when a link in the menu is pressed. For that I'd recommend using AJAX (preferably using a library like jQuery, just because it makes it a lot easier). Another solution would be to make a lot of pages with all the same header and menu but with different content, but I would not recommend doing this. You will regret it forever.

A simple script would be:

$(function() {
    $("a").each(function() {
        var pat = /^https?:\/\//i;
        var url = $(this).attr("href");
        if(!pat.test(url)) {
            $("body").on("click", "a", (function(e) {
                e.preventDefault();
                $.get(url, function(data) {
                    $("#content").html(data);
                });
            });
        }
    });
}

Here all relative links are set to load the content into the content div without reloading the page. So:

<a href="contact.html">Contact us!</a>

will load the content of contact.html into the content div and:

<a href="http://www.google.com">Google.com</a>

will redirect the page to google.com.

Other things to consider is changing the url when changing the content. But that's a whole different story.

Hope this helps.

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Hi Raapwerk, thanks for your reply. I am going to test your code. –  Ravi Bhartiya Jan 12 '13 at 20:44

Frames are definitely deprecated and as you rightly point outright very much actively discouraged by major websites. Many websites this days use CSS in concert for Javascript (especially through the use of libraries like jQuery (especially the UI portion) and Dojo) in order to have the kind of dynamic layout frames used to provide.

This is especially the case for when parts of a page need to be reloaded without reloading the entire page in which case AJAX is usually used to load parts of the page. There are many great tutorials out there which I won't list here (google is your friend!) on how to accomplish this and achieve layouts similar to what frames used to provide.

This is definitely an answer at its most generic though because I don't know your coding skill level or budget (time or money) as there are many easy ways to stand up a simple website as well (Sites.google.com, among many others).

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Hi il-Kelma, thanks for your reply. I have been searching any layout plugin like layout.jquery-dev.net –  Ravi Bhartiya Jan 12 '13 at 20:46

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