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I am facing a problem to save data using UnitOfWork. I mean I am unable to save data using UnitOFWork.Commit() from Controller class. My Implementation check bellow.

IUnitOfWork

public interface IUnitOfWork<C> :  IDisposable
{
        int Commit();
        C GetContext { get; set; }
        TransactionScope BeginTransaction();
} 

UnitOfWork

   public class UnitOfWork<C> : IUnitOfWork<C> where C : DbContext
    {
        private bool _disposed;
        private readonly C _dbContext = null;
        private TransactionScope _transaction;

        public UnitOfWork()
        {
            GetContext = _dbContext ?? Activator.CreateInstance<C>();
        }

        public int Commit()
        {
            return GetContext.SaveChanges();
        }


        public C GetContext
        {
            get;
            set;
        }


        public TransactionScope BeginTransaction()
        {
            if (null != _transaction)
            {
                _transaction = new TransactionScope();
            }

            return _transaction;
        }

        #region IDisposable Members
        protected virtual void Dispose(bool disposing)
        {
            if (!_disposed)
            {
                if (disposing)
                {
                    if (null != _transaction)
                    {
                        _transaction.Dispose();
                    }

                    if (null != _dbContext)
                    {
                        _dbContext.Dispose();
                    }

                }

            }

            _disposed = true;
        }

        public void Dispose()
        {
            Dispose(true);
            GC.SuppressFinalize(this);
        }
        #endregion


    }

Now within RepositoryBase / GenericRepository

public abstract class RepositoryBase<C, E> : IRepository<E> where E : class where C : DbContext
    {
        private readonly IDbSet<E> _dbSet;

        protected RepositoryBase(IUnitOfWork<C> unitOfWork)
        {
            UnitOfWork = unitOfWork;

            _dbSet = UnitOfWork.GetContext.Set<E>();

        }

        protected IUnitOfWork<C> UnitOfWork
        {
            get;
            private set;
        }


        #region IRepository<E> Members

        public void Insert(E entity)
        {
            _dbSet.Add(entity);
            UnitOfWork.GetContext.Entry(entity).State = System.Data.EntityState.Added;
            UnitOfWork.Commit();
        }

[...]

When I use UnitOfWork.Commit(); within GenericRepository I am able to save data successfully. But When I use UnitOfWork.Commit(); withing Controller I am unable to save data.

Controller Code

    private readonly IEmployeeRepository _employeeRepository;

    public EmployeeController(IEmployeeRepository employeeRepositoty, IUnitOfWork<MyDbContext> unitOfWork)
    {
        UnitOfWork = unitOfWork;
        this._employeeRepository = employeeRepositoty;
    }

  [HttpPost]
        public ActionResult Create(EmployeeModel employeemodel)
        {
            if (ModelState.IsValid)
            {

                    using (UnitOfWork)
                    {
                        _employeeRepository.Insert(employeemodel);

                        UnitOfWork.Commit();  //OR UnitOfWork.GetContext.SaveChanges();                  

                    }  

                return RedirectToAction("Index");
            }

            return View(employeemodel);
        }

If I use UnitOfWork.commit() within Controller then GenericRepository Insert method code check bellow

        public void Insert(E entity)
        {
            _dbSet.Add(entity);
            UnitOfWork.GetContext.Entry(entity).State = System.Data.EntityState.Added;
        }

As per my understanding this is a designing issue of UnitOfWork. Please help me to solve that.

IEmployeeRepository

public interface IEmployeeRepository : IRepository<EmployeeModel>
{

}

public class EmployeeRepository : RepositoryBase<MyDbContext, EmployeeModel>, IEmployeeRepository
{
    public EmployeeRepository(IUnitOfWork<MyDbMContext> unitOfWork)
        : base(unitOfWork)
    {

    }
}

NinjetDIConfiguration

kernel.Bind<IUnitOfWork<MyDbContext>>().To<UnitOfWork<MyDbContext>>();
kernel.Bind<ICountryRepository>().To<CountryRepository>();
kernel.Bind<IUserProfileRepository>().To<UserProfileRepository>();
kernel.Bind<IEmployeeRepository>().To<EmployeeRepository>();
share|improve this question
1  
What's the error thrown? –  mattytommo Jan 12 '13 at 20:06
1  
Define "unable to save". Does it throw an exception? Does it do nothing? Does it dance a little jig and give you the bird? –  Erik Funkenbusch Jan 13 '13 at 1:39

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Probably Wrong DI (Ninject) Configuration create the problem. Solution check bellow.

kernel.Bind<IUnitOfWork<MyDbContext>>().To<UnitOfWork<MyDbContext>>().InRequestScope();
kernel.Bind<IEmployeeRepository>().To<EmployeeRepository>().InRequestScope();

Actualy I don't use .InRequestScope(); in my previous configuration. that's why It create mysterious behavior.

But Still unable to understand the reason behind that. Clarification welcome.

According the clarification of Mystere Man (Problem: Since you use UnitOfWork both in your repository, and in your controller, you had two different instances, and each instance had its own context. So, you added the entities to one context (the one in your repository) but you called SaveChanges on a different context. Since that different context didn't have anything added to it, nothing happened.

Suggestion: you shouldn't need to make the repository InRequestScope, only the UnitOfWork, since that holds the context).

So the Best solution check bellow.

kernel.Bind<IUnitOfWork<MyDbContext>>().To<UnitOfWork<MyDbContext>>().InRequestScope();
kernel.Bind<IEmployeeRepository>().To<EmployeeRepository>();

Without using _dbContext ?? Activator.CreateInstance<C>(); , can it be possible to get DbContext instance via Ninject ?

Yes it is poositble According to MystereMan Suggestion. Check the solution bellow

Ninject DI Configuration

kernel.Bind<MyDbContext>().ToSelf().InRequestScope();
kernel.Bind<IUnitOfWork<MyDbContext>>().To<UnitOfWork<MyDbContext>>();
kernel.Bind<IEmployeeRepository>().To<EmployeeRepository>();

And within UnitOfWork

   public class UnitOfWork<C> : IUnitOfWork<C> where C : DbContext
    {
        private readonly C _dbcontext;

        public UnitOfWork(C dbcontext)
        {
            _dbcontext = dbcontext;
        }

        public int Commit()
        {
           return _dbcontext.SaveChanges();
        }

        public C GetContext
        {
            get
            {
                return _dbcontext;
            }

        }
[...]
share|improve this answer
    
InRequestScope() tells Ninject to pass the same instance of the object each time it's requested within a single Web Request. Since you use UnitOfWork both in your repository, and in your controller, you had two different instances, and each instance had its own context. So, you added the entities to one context (the one in your repository) but you called SaveChanges on a different context. Since that different context didn't have anything added to it, nothing happened. This is one reason I discourage the use of UnitOfWork, since EF implements UnitOfWork itself. –  Erik Funkenbusch Jan 13 '13 at 13:46
    
Usually implementing UoW on top of EF is redundant, unless you absolutely are sure you need to change your database technology in the future, and even then the benefits are dubious, since you will likely have to re-implement many queries. –  Erik Funkenbusch Jan 13 '13 at 13:48
    
Also, you shouldn't need to make the repository InRequestScope, only the UnitOfWork, since that holds the context. From your other post, you suggested that you had already tried using InRequestScope, so I didn't suggest that. –  Erik Funkenbusch Jan 13 '13 at 13:52
    
UoW is not redundant for Entity Framework, quite often you want to get changes from several repositories to get written in the same transaction. Not possible unless you expose the EF db context or a UoW –  jgauffin Jan 14 '13 at 6:31
    
@Mystere Man : Thanks for the clarification, you suggested that you had already tried using InRequestScope, so I didn't suggest that. . yes I did that but not in proper way, that a wrong implementation. This is one reason I discourage the use of UnitOfWork yes I agree on that, this also my personal feelings. you shouldn't need to make the repository InRequestScope, only the UnitOfWork, since that holds the context - I will follow that. –  Shubhajyoti Ghosh Jan 14 '13 at 13:23

There's a lot of things you have left out of your question. It looks like you may be using some kind of dependency injection, if that's the case, what DI framework are you using, and how are your bindings declared?

The real problem here is, I think, that your repository is being created with a different UnitOfWork than the one which you are using to call Commit(). Looking at how the Controller is constructed and passed the instances will determine how to fix the problem.

By the way, TransactionScope is generally not required with EF, since it uses an implied transaction already.

Also, i'd be very careful about that using statement. It can create a serious bug if you try to use the UnitOfWork outside that block. Instead, I would let my DI framework take care of disposing the UnitOfWork, since it's the one that created it.

For that matter, I would also use the DI framework to create the context in your UoW instead of using Activator.

share|improve this answer
    
I use Ninject as DI Framework. Why do think it is a problem of DI? As a Said I am able to Save data , when I call UnitOfWork.Comit() within GenericRepository. But when I want to use within Controller then unable to save data using UnitOfWork.commit(), Using Di I use Kernrl.bind<IUnitOWork<MyDbContext>>.To<UnitOfWork>();. So do you feel forcefully create of GetContext = _dbContext ?? Activator.CreateInstance<C>(); is the problem ? Because I already declare Kernrl.bind !!! –  Shubhajyoti Ghosh Jan 13 '13 at 6:41
    
@ShubhajyotiGhosh - No, It's not a problem of DI, it's most likely a problem with how you are using and/or configuring your DI. Your controller receives two objects in the constructor, which I assume (I have to assume, because you refuse to show us the code) that is being created by Ninject, which means it creates two different instances of UnitOfWork (the one passed into the controller and the one created in the repository). –  Erik Funkenbusch Jan 13 '13 at 8:22
    
Di Configuration kernel.Bind<IEmployeeRepository>().To<EmployeeRepository>().InRequestScope(); //For Unit Of Work Kernrl.bind<IUnitOWork<MyDbContext>>.To<UnitOfWork>(); Or kernel.Bind<IUnitOfWork<MyDbContext>>().To<MyDbContext>().InRequestScope(); Or kernel.Bind<IUnitOfWork<MyDbContext>>().To<UnitOfWork<MyDbContext>>().InRequestS‌​cope(); More explanation you may found here [codereview.stackexchange.com/questions/20481/… –  Shubhajyoti Ghosh Jan 13 '13 at 9:58
    
public interface IEmployeeRepository : IRepository<EmployeeModel> { } public class EmployeeRepository : RepositoryBase<EauthorityContext, EmployeeModel>, IEmployeeRepository { public EmployeeRepository(IUnitOfWork<MyDbContext> unitOfWork) : base(unitOfWork) { } } –  Shubhajyoti Ghosh Jan 13 '13 at 9:59
    
@ShubhajyotiGhosh - edit your post, don't post it in comments, it's impossible to read. –  Erik Funkenbusch Jan 13 '13 at 11:11

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