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I have written the following function to calculate GCD of floating point numbers, but when I run this for the input (111.6, 46.5), the calculation of fmod(a,b) in the funciton starts giving the wrong result after 2 recursive calls. I am unable to find the error here. Can anyone find what is going wrong here?

float gcd(float a, float b){
if (a>b) {
    if(b==0){
        return a;
    }
    else {
        return gcd(b, fmod(a,b));
    }
}
else {
    if (a==0) {
        return b;
    }
    else {
        return gcd(fmod(b,a), a);
    }
}

}

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closed as too localized by Oli Charlesworth, WhozCraig, Don Roby, Jonathan Leffler, Joe Jan 13 '13 at 16:19

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Welcome to Stack Overflow! Asking people to spot errors in your code is not productive. You should use the debugger (or add print statements) to isolate the problem, and then construct a minimal test-case. –  Oli Charlesworth Jan 12 '13 at 20:13
3  
What do you mean by gcd of floating point numbers? I don't think this algorithm can work for anything but integers. And even if it works for rational numbers, I don't think it can work for floats. –  zch Jan 12 '13 at 20:18
3  
what value were you expecting for gcd(111.6,46.5)? –  user1055604 Jan 12 '13 at 20:25
1  
@zch: Of course the algorithm works for rational numbers and floats. Euclid originally wrote it for real numbers, in the form of line segments. (Elements, Book VII, circa 300 BCE: Propositions 1 and 2.) –  Eric Postpischil Jan 12 '13 at 21:05
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2 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Because of the way that floating-point values are represented, the source text “111.6” is converted to 111.599999999999994315658113919198513031005859375, and the source text “46.5” is converted to 46.5. Then your gcd function returns 7.62939453125e-06. That is the correct GCD of the two input values.

Note that the first value is 14627635/131072. All floating-point numbers are some integer (within a certain range) multiplied or divided by a power of two. It is impossible to represent 111.6 exactly with binary floating-point. Since you cannot represent 111.6 exactly, you cannot do exact arithmetic with it. Floating-point is largely designed for approximate arithmetic. Doing exact arithmetic requires a great deal of care.


What does it mean to talk about the GCD of real numbers (as opposed to integers)?

The GCD of a and b is the largest number c such that a/c and b/c are integers.

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What does it mean to talk about the GCD of real numbers? (as opposed to integers) –  Oli Charlesworth Jan 12 '13 at 20:48
    
@OliCharlesworth: The GCD of a and b is the largest number c such that a/c and b/c are integers. –  Eric Postpischil Jan 12 '13 at 20:55
    
But in general, that won't exist. It exists only if a = b.d, where d is a rational. –  Oli Charlesworth Jan 12 '13 at 21:08
    
@OliCharlesworth: So? Would you also lodge a complaint about division on the integers since, in general, the quotient of two integers does not exist? (E.g., 1/0.) I feel as comfortable talking about the GCDs of real numbers as I do the quotients of integers. –  Eric Postpischil Jan 12 '13 at 21:10
1  
@thkala: The notion that you cannot test for equality in floating point is a myth. A more correct statement is that you cannot accurately calculate a function of inaccurate inputs. Equality is just the most notorious example (“Here is something that is close to a and something that is close to b. Are a and b equal?”), but other functions have problems too (“Here is something close to a. It may be greater than 1, even though a is not. What is the arcsine of a?”). In this case, all of the math inside gcd is exact, so there is no inaccuracy and no problem with ==. –  Eric Postpischil Jan 12 '13 at 21:28
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float gcd(float a, float b){
    printf("a=%f b=%f\n",a,b);
if (a>b) {
    if(b==0){
        return a;
    }
    else {
        return gcd(b, fmod(a,b));
    }
}
else {
    if (a==0) {
        return b;
    }
    else {
        return gcd(fmod(b,a), a);
    }
}
}
main(){
    printf("%f\ndddeellliiimmiitteerr\n",gcd(1116,465));
    printf("%f\n",gcd(111.6,46.5));
}

so as u can see float not so accurate .
you can try double (but it too :) ) or ... read about how float stored

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