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I'm still new here, but I came across questioning why I was under the belief that the below could not be done.

I'm trying to assign foobar to the value of "Hello there!\n". Either it can't be done, or I'm having a hard time figuring it out.

EDIT: I need to clear up that I'm looking for why the below does not work, not 1 of many solutions that can take it's place.

EDIT: I took the answer of "You can not concatenate strings variable in c in that way." Presumably because it was too difficult to write the parser to allow the below way. I'm too new to know any different, and too new to be so concerned. If anyone ever finds a formal reason with citation, please post it.

#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{

char *foo = "Hello";
char *bar = " there!\n";
const char *foobar = (*foo) *bar;

printf("%s", foobar);

return 0;

}

This doesn't seem like it should be a problem.

share|improve this question
1  
You're looking for snprintf(buffer, sizeof(buffer), "%s%s", foo, bar) –  cnicutar Jan 12 '13 at 20:26
1  
No, you cannot do this. –  Oliver Charlesworth Jan 12 '13 at 20:26
    
@cnicutar: Yes, that is what I have been doing, but I never thought about trying the above way first. After I thought about it, I thought why not? What I'm trying to do is logical, doesn't seem harmful. –  JustTired Jan 12 '13 at 20:29
    
why dont you simply concatenate foo and bar and then assign it to foobar. –  exex zian Jan 12 '13 at 20:31
    
Is foo and baa know at compile-time? –  Jack Jan 12 '13 at 20:37

4 Answers 4

up vote 11 down vote accepted

You can not concatenate strings variable in c in that way.

You need a memory space in which you will copy both strings in that memory.

The memory space could be a static buffer like char foobar[100]if you already know that the size of your strings could not be bigger than the defined size. Or the memory could be dynamiuc buffer if you do not know the limit size of your string as indicating in the following example

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

int main()
{

   char *foo = "Hello";
   char *bar = " there!\n";
   char *foobar = malloc(strlen(foo) + strlen(bar) + 1);
   strcpy(foobar,foo);
   strcat(foobar,bar);
   printf("%s", foobar);

   return 0;

}

If you allocate the memory with malloc() then do not forget to free the foobar memory whene it become useless in your program with

free(foobar);
share|improve this answer
    
+1, this is a correct solution. –  user529758 Jan 12 '13 at 20:31
4  
Although, it would be nice if it included the relevant free... –  Oliver Charlesworth Jan 12 '13 at 20:37
    
And surely we could use a buffer of, say, 100 bytes rather than call malloc in the first place. –  Mats Petersson Jan 12 '13 at 20:38
4  
@MatsPetersson: Why? can't be the strings greater than 100-size? Well,I believe that foo and baa and its values are examples only. If such strings are constants,just use char* foobaa = FOO BAA; –  Jack Jan 12 '13 at 20:42
1  
Of course, if there is a reason to believe strings are long enough to overflow 100 bytes, you need to do something to cope with that. But my point is rather that people VERY often suggest "use malloc", when in fact a simple local array would be perfectly good and will avoid the problem of having to free the alloocated string - allocating memory to hold a 7 byte array is quite wasteful. In both Windows and Linux, allocations can easily take up 16-32 bytes of "overhead" on top of the allocated size - so at least double the size of the actual string in this case. –  Mats Petersson Jan 12 '13 at 20:46

Your code probably compiles with no problem but there are some possible mistakes in there.

First two char* (or string) declarations are legit. The third one not that much. You are casting (*bar) as *foo, wich is not a data type but a variable, and you set foobar to that casted value of foo, instead of doing string concatenation.

C doesn't do string concatenation with operators. Instead, you need to use specific libraries to concatenate strings or make your own functions. For strings you have string.h

For this particular case, you have strcat: It takes two strings and returns a new string with the concatenation of those two strings.

So, for your example:

char *foo = "Hello";
char *bar = " there!\n";
const char *foobar = malloc((strlen(foo)+strlen(bar))*sizeof(char));
foobar = strcat(foo,bar);

Something like this.

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer

Answering the "edited" question:

It doesn't work because the C language as such has no knowledge of how to concatenate strings. You are supposed to use strcat or some other function. Further, the compiler wouldn't know where to put the string in memory, snce it can't use the storage for "foo" and "bar" to store the resulting string.

Of course, in C, the meaning of *foo in your code is the letter 'H', and *bar turns into ' '. So (*foo) *bar becomes ('H') ' ' which has absolutely no useful meaning in C.

share|improve this answer
    
Surely you mean *foo turns to 'H' and *bar turns to '(space)'. –  user1055604 Jan 12 '13 at 20:46
    
Yes, I was looking at one of the answers, which had "foo" and "bar" as strings... Fixed, and clarified a little bit. –  Mats Petersson Jan 12 '13 at 20:48
    
Right, I understand. But that didn't even work. It was just a question of logic of the language itself. I'm giving up looking for the logic. It really is not worth the bother being it can work other ways. –  JustTired Jan 12 '13 at 20:59
    
Yes, it really is "you can't do that in C" (for arbitrary strings, without strong limitations and using macros, etc) –  Mats Petersson Jan 12 '13 at 21:04

In C, strings can't be concatenated with the way you do. One possible way which mimics what you are trying do is to make use of preprocessor:

#include <stdio.h>
#define FOO "foo"
#define BAR "bar"

int main()
{
char *foo = FOO;
char *bar = BAR;
const char *foobar = FOO BAR;

printf("%s", foobar);

return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Right, but when dmr, or whoever set out in how string assignments work, what led them to not allow what I posted? –  JustTired Jan 12 '13 at 20:40
    
I know some other languages do that but not C. For e.g. in bash you can do that with: foobar=$foo$bar but not in C. foo and bar are pointers to string literals and are not replaced with their values in C. –  Blue Moon Jan 12 '13 at 20:49

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