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I am trying to execute a program that prints the numerical value when the && operator returns true and when it returns false. The code is as follows:-

#include <stdio.h>
main()
{
int a,b;
scanf("%d%d",&a,&b);
printf("Part I\n");
printf("(a%2 == 0) && (b%2 == 0): %d\n",(a%2 == 0) && (b%2 == 0));
printf("(a%3 == 0) && (b%3 == 0): %d\n",(a%3 == 0) && (b%3 == 0));
printf("(a%5 == 0) && (b%5 == 0): %d\n",(a%5 == 0) && (b%5 == 0));
printf("(a%7 == 0) && (b%7 == 0): %d\n",(a%7 == 0) && (b%7 == 0));
printf("Part II\n");
printf("The AND operator yields: %d\n",(a%2 == 0) && (b%2 == 0));
printf("The AND operator yields: %d\n",(a%3 == 0) && (b%3 == 0));
printf("The AND operator yields: %d\n",(a%5 == 0) && (b%5 == 0));
printf("The AND operator yields: %d\n",(a%7 == 0) && (b%7 == 0));

return 0;
}

The output ( along with my input ) is as follows:-

210
210
Part I
(a%2 == 0) && (b%2 == 0): %d
(a%2 == 0) && (b%2 == 0): %d
(a%2 == 0) && (b%2 == 0): %d
(a%2 == 0) && (b%2 == 0): %d
Part II
The AND operator yields: 1
The AND operator yields: 1
The AND operator yields: 1
The AND operator yields: 1

Why is the first part behaving in such a manner? This is happening even when I replace && by ||. I am using a Borland C++ Compiler 5.5 . Please Help.

share|improve this question
5  
Please, for the sake of everyone, use a compiler that was written in the last decade. Borland C++ is ancient. You will run into a ton of weird bugs and missing features if you use it. – duskwuff Jan 12 '13 at 20:34
    
agreed with @duskwuff better use gcc coz your code working fine on gcc – exexzian Jan 12 '13 at 20:36
1  
@sansix: But the behaviour is undefined. – Oliver Charlesworth Jan 12 '13 at 20:40
    
@OliCharlesworth yeah it is which varies from one compiler to another – exexzian Jan 12 '13 at 20:55
    
@duskwuff Of course there are newer versions and one should consider adapting to C99/C11. But I believe the Borland 5.5 complier was released about 10 years ago. If one is only concerned with having a C90 compliant compiler, there's a lot of worse ones out there. Particularly bad ones are Visual Studio or gcc without the -std option, those are far far worse than Borland 5.5. gcc -std=c99 -pedantic-errors is a very good compiler, however. – Lundin Jan 12 '13 at 21:43
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Because if you want to actually display a %, then you must escape it in the printf format string with another %. e.g.

printf("(a%%2 == 0) && (b%%2 == 0): %d\n",(a%2 == 0) && (b%2 == 0));
          ^              ^
share|improve this answer
    
So two % signs are nullifying the effect of %d as the integer format specifier. Hence, the sentence is getting printed as it is. But then the problem arises that the two % symbols aren't adjacent to the last one, so how is this happening? – kusur Jan 12 '13 at 20:34
    
@kusur: In your original code, the behaviour was undefined. What you were seeing was an artifact of your particular compiler; with a different compiler, something different might have happened. – Oliver Charlesworth Jan 12 '13 at 20:35
    
Thanks for the reply. – kusur Jan 12 '13 at 20:37

I've tested this with http://codepad.org/, which I think uses gcc, and the code worked ok. But you might try to add an extra % before a literal % (i.e, %%) so the compiler knows the % that follows is an actual character. Like this:

printf("Part I\n");
printf("(a%%2 == 0) && (b%%2 == 0): %d\n",(a%2 == 0) && (b%2 == 0));
printf("(a%%3 == 0) && (b%%3 == 0): %d\n",(a%3 == 0) && (b%3 == 0));
printf("(a%%5 == 0) && (b%%5 == 0): %d\n",(a%5 == 0) && (b%5 == 0));
printf("(a%%7 == 0) && (b%%7 == 0): %d\n",(a%7 == 0) && (b%7 == 0));
share|improve this answer
    
Yea, I didn't really tested, but as I wrote, try with \% or %% :P – Alko Jan 12 '13 at 20:49
    
Needs to be %%. \% is meaningless. – duskwuff Jan 12 '13 at 21:22
    
sorry, I will delete my answer – Alko Jan 12 '13 at 23:04

You are actually using illegal escape sequence character to print % in the first part. Thats why printf is yielding garbage values.

printf("(a%2 == 0) && (b%2 == 0): %d\n",(a%2 == 0) && (b%2 == 0));
              ^                        ^
      Here is you are mistaking

It should be like

printf("(a%%2 == 0) && (b%%2 == 0): %d\n",(a%2 == 0) && (b%2 == 0));  

You can also read about all format specifiers used in C.

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