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I come from C++, found out "this" only means execution context. Is there a guaranteed way to get self instance?

I ask this because I always try to get instance by "this" in javascript, but I have to do various ways to guarantee it by myself, such as ways described as follow:

MyClass.prototype.OnSomethingHappened = function () {
  // I want to get the reference to the instance of this class.
}

But this kind of function is often called like:

var bar = new MyClass();
foo.onclick = bar.OnSomethingHappened;

When onclick happend, OnSomethingHappened get called, but "this" does not mean the instance of bar.

There are some solution like:

var bar = new MyClass();
foo.onclick = function () {
  bar.OnSomethingHappened();
}

Yes, it works perfectly here. But consider:

var bar = new MyClass();
MyClass.prototype.OnSomethingHappened = function () {
  // I want to get the reference to the instance of this class.
}
MyClass.prototype.IWantToBindSomething = function () {
  // sorry for using jquery in a pure javascript question
  $("div#someclass").bind("click", function () {
  bar.OnSomethingHappened();
  });  // I think this is a very very bad practice because it uses a global variable in a class, but I can't think of other workaround, since I have no guaranteed way of getting the instance.
}
share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

No, the concept of a "class" really doesn't exist in JavaScript the way it does in C++. There's no intrinsic relationship between a function and any particular object. Functions are just values.

(Well there's no relationship other than the "casual" relationship when an object has a property that refers to a function.)

However, it's possible to force a particular value of this by wrapping a function in another function that uses .call() or .apply() to invoke the target function. You can do that with .bind() in newer browsers, or simply with an anonymous (or not-anonymous) wrapper.

edit — what's important to understand about this is that it's value is completely determined by the way a function is invoked, at each point of invocation. Thus, if you have an object:

var myObj = new Something();

and you want to use myObj.handler as an event handler (common situation) such that this in the event handler refers to the object, you simply need a wrapper:

$('whatever').click( function(ev) { myObj.handler(ev); } );

In that example, it's not necessary that "myObj" be a global variable:

function justAnExample() {
  var myObj = new Something();

  $('whatever').click( function(ev) { myObj.handler(ev); } );
}

In that you can clearly see that "myObj" is a local variable inside the "justAnExample" function. Because JavaScript has real closures, the invocation context of "justAnExample" is preserved after a call, and it's there for use by the anonymous wrapper function passed as the event handler to jQuery.

share|improve this answer
    
But that still need to call it with a global instance. Consider my last code case, is there a good way to do that? I just don't understand why "this" similar to C++ is not provided to js? – Helin Wang Jan 12 '13 at 21:01
    
No, you don't need a global instance. JavaScript is just a completely different language, with a significantly different execution model. – Pointy Jan 12 '13 at 21:11
    
I'll edit my post and add some more information. – Pointy Jan 12 '13 at 21:16

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