Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What if I had something like this:

try
{
   //work
}
catch (ArgumentNullException e)
{
   HandleNullException();
   Logger.log("ArgumentNullException " + e);
   DoSomething();
}
catch (SomeOtherException e)
{
   HandleSomeOtherException();
   Logger.log("SomeOtherException " + e);
   DoSomething();
}
catch (Exception e)
{
   HandleException();
   Logger.log("Exception " + e);
   DoSomething();
}

Now as we can see, I'm trying to handle exceptions for some different cases. BUT whenever an exception is raised, I'm always calling the method DoSomething() at the end. Is there a smarter way to call DoSomething() if there is an exception? If I added a finally block and called DoSomething() there, it would always be called, even when there is no exception. Any suggestions?

share|improve this question
3  
@JanesAbouChleih Then instead of having redundant code for calling a method, he'd have redundant code to set a boolean. –  Eve Jan 12 '13 at 21:41
    
@Eve: Yep, edited my post. Modify the bool if no Exception is thrown. –  Janes Abou Chleih Jan 12 '13 at 21:46
1  
@Eve: Replacing redundant method calls with redundant setting of a flag can be an improvement nevertheless. Let's assume that the OP at some point wants to replace DoSomething with DoSomethingElse. With the flag in place, s/he will only have to modify the code in one place. Without a flag, possibly more than one location would have to be modified in the same fashion. What if the OP overlooked one of them? So IMHO introducing a flag improves DRY (Don't Repeat Yourself) and eliminates a potential error source. –  stakx Jan 12 '13 at 22:10
    
@stakx With my solution (to have just one catch block, see my answer), I think he eliminates the "DRY" (code duplication) without introducing a painful boolean like didAnyCatchBlockRun. –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Jan 12 '13 at 23:32
    
@JeppeStigNielsen: See your answer for my reply to your above comment. –  stakx Jan 13 '13 at 1:47
add comment

6 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

If I added a finally block and called DoSomething() there, it would always be called, even when there is no exception.

What you are looking for is known in the CLI standard (partition IIA, chapter 18) as a fault handler. Although .NET implements them, the C# language does not directly support them. However, they can be emulated:

bool success = false;
try
{
    …
    success = true;
}
catch (…)
{
    …
}
…
finally
{
    if (!success)
    {
        DoSomething();
    }
}

Note that there is no need to set the flag inside every catch handler, as some answers here suggest. Simply negate the test, and you only need to set the flag once, at the end of the try block.

share|improve this answer
add comment

You can use the following code which actually does remove redundancies.

try
{
    //work
}
catch (Exception e)
{
    Handle(e);
}

Where the Handle method is:

static void Handle(Exception e)
{
    var exceptionType = e.GetType();
    //Use an if/else block, or use a Dictionary<Type, Action>
    //to operate on your exception
    Logger.log(exceptionType + " " + e);
    DoSomething();
}
share|improve this answer
    
IMO this and @stakx approach is the best +1 for both. –  Fallup Jan 12 '13 at 21:49
add comment

What you are doing now is about as good as it gets.

If you need to call this function whenever an exception happens, but not otherwise, and you must have different code for handling different exceptions, than this is the best that can be done.

share|improve this answer
    
If most of what is to be done does not depend on what eception type is being handled, he can have just one catch block, and cope with the small differences by saying if (e is ArgumentNullException) and so on. See my answer if it's not clear what I mean. –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Jan 12 '13 at 23:27
add comment

Why not just:

try
{
    //work
}
catch (Exception e)
{
    if (e is ArgumentNullException)
      HandleNullException();
    else if (e is SomeOtherException)
      HandleSomeOtherException();
    else
      HandleException();
    Logger.log(e.GetType().Name + " " + e);
    DoSomething();
}

The type name logged will be the actual runtime type, so for example "IndexOutOfRangeException" may be logged instead of just "Exception" if you're in case three, but I see this as an improvement over what you have now.

Edit: Above code looks awful with the ifelse if logic checking on types. If we introduced polymorphism, it could be more beautiful:

try
{
    //work
}
catch (HandleableException e)
{
    e.Handle();  // this calls a **virtual** method, each override does what's relevant
    Logger.log(e.GetType().Name + " " + e);
    DoSomething();
}

Of course, if some of the Exception classes in question cannot be modified by us, it would be impossible to give them a Handle() method. The .Handle() could also be an extension method (instead of a virtual instance method), but then the type checking (ugly code) would have to be done inside that method. Then this becomes quite similar to Eve's answer.

share|improve this answer
    
-1. This solves the problem at the expense of introducing a worse issue into the code than what the OP was trying to get rid of! if (… is FooException) … else if (… is BarException) … goes against two fundamental things: (1) the very reason why you can have several catch handlers; and (2) OOP polymorphism. Concerning this last point, see e.g. the 2008 talk, 'Conditionals and Polymorphism' by Misko Hevery. –  stakx Jan 13 '13 at 1:38
1  
@stakx The code wasn't too beautiful to begin with. Do you love several catch blocks (some of which are related, like Exception is base class of SomeOtherException, while SomeOtherException is not a base class of ArgumentNullException) very much? In my opinion the if (e is T) … else if (e is S) and so on, is ugly, but several catch blocks is equally ugly. And I don't like the solution of "factoring out" logic common to many catch blocks and putting it into a finally block with an obscure if in it. finally blocks are designed for things that must run in any case. –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Jan 13 '13 at 8:37
1  
+1 for your latest addition. Note however that a bunch of extension methods Handle(this SomeExceptionType) will not work as you might expect: For instance, if you have both Handle(this Exception) and Handle(this FooException), only the first one will ever get called, even for FooException instances. This is because e in e.Handle() has the static (compile-time) type Exception. The method to be called is resolved statically by the compiler, based static type information. That is, there is no virtual dispatch with extension methods. –  stakx Jan 13 '13 at 11:06
    
@stakx You're absolutely correct about that. I made one more edit to remove the misleading part. The only way to get overload resolution based on the actual runtime type is to defer the binding until runtime (can be done with the dynamic keyword, Handle((dynamic)e);). –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Jan 13 '13 at 11:24
add comment

You could set a boolean whenever a exception is thrown, use finally and check for the boolean. (Or do the opposite and set the boolean only when no exception is thrown, as shown below:)

bool noException = false;
try
{
    //work
    noException = true;
}
catch (ArgumentNullException e)
{
    HandleNullException();
    Logger.log("ArgumentNullException " + e);
}
catch (SomeOtherException e)
{
    HandleSomeOtherException();
    Logger.log("SomeOtherException " + e);
}
catch (Exception e)
{
    HandleException();
    Logger.log("Exception " + e);
}
finally
{
    if (!noException)
        DoSomething();
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

You can do this:

Exception caughtException = null;
try {
    ...
} catch(ExceptionType1 e1) {
    ...
    caughtException = e1;
} catch(ExceptionType2 e2) {
    ...
    caughtException = e2;
} catch(ExceptionType3 e3) {
    ...
    caughtException = e3;
}
if (caughtException != null) {
    // Put your common exception code here
    DoSomenthing();
    // You can pass caughtException to functions, too
    LogException(caughtException);
}

caughtException will be null unless an exception is caught. You can use it to decide to call DoSomenthing or not.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.