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I am trying to determine whether the current object within a foreach loop nested inside of another foreach loop, which are both iterating over the same ArrayList, are currently both iterating over the same object. Due to the conventions of the foreach loop, there doesn't appear to be a simple way to get the current index of the objects in the ArrayList to be able to compare the current objects for equality. Essentially, I would like to continue over the current object within the inner foreach loop if both of the foreach loops are currently iterating over the same object.

For example, given an ArrayList<Object> named objects:

for (Object a : objects) {

    for (Object b : objects) {

        //If both loops are currently iterating over the same object
        //from the ArrayList objects, skip to the next iteration of the inner
        //foreach loop
        if (a == b) {

            continue;

        }

        //If both foreach loops are not iterating over the same object
        //execute some operation

    }

}

Is using the == operator to test whether both objects that are currently being iterated over are the same object reliable, or is it better to simply use regular for loops instead and compare the objects based on their index?

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How would you use the iterators to compare the indexes of the boxes? –  Kevin Gurney Jan 12 '13 at 21:53

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

It is OK to compare objects with == in this case, but only if you didn't put the same object in list multiple times. If you have same object in list on multiple places than this is not OK, and you should use standard for loop.

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Ah, that is an interesting point! Is there any way to compare the objects reliably, even if the object is in the list multiple times? –  Kevin Gurney Jan 12 '13 at 21:56
    
No, I don't think it is. I also wouldn't use equals because it can return true if object are equals by data (if it is implemented to work like that) which I don't think you want to do. For example if you have two strings with same value, these are two objects but equals will return true! –  partlov Jan 12 '13 at 21:59
    
Ok! Thank you for your help! –  Kevin Gurney Jan 12 '13 at 22:00
    
@KevinGurney See my answer for a way to compare the objects reliably, even if the object is in the list multiple times. –  recursion.ninja Jan 12 '13 at 22:20

I would do it as:

for (Object a : objects) {

    for(int i = 0; i < objects.size(); i++) {

        if(a.equals(objects.get(i)) {

            continue;
        }

    }

}

that is he easiest way to do it in my eyes.

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I was considering doing it this way, but is there an alternative method which will allow foreach loops to be used? –  Kevin Gurney Jan 12 '13 at 21:57
    
Not that I can think of. Is there a specific reason why you would like to use foreach loops? I personally am not a huge fan of them. –  Nick Jan 12 '13 at 23:16
    
Well, I suppose mostly because foreach loops seem to align more closely with object-oriented practices than regular for loops. However, I suppose the same thing could be accomplished simply using for loops with a fairly negligible difference in implementation. –  Kevin Gurney Jan 16 '13 at 13:35
    
foreach loops are specifically for object oriented looping yes, but if feel hat it is just easier to read and see the process being accomplished. foreach loops do have their benefits, however in the end I feel like it is a mater of opinion, and if you're pressed for time or length of code. –  Nick Jan 17 '13 at 1:04

If the same object is added into the ArrayList multiple times the == equality comparison may have undesired results. To check that you are not on comparing the same indexed items of the ArrayList (ie: you are currently on the diagonal of the 2D matrix)

Consider this:

Iterator<Object> outerIterator, innerIterator;
outerIterator = objects.iterator();
for (int i=0; outerIterator.hasNext(); ++i) {
    a = outerIterator.next();
    innerIterator = objects.iterator();
    for(int j=0; innerIterator.hasNext(); ++j) {
        b = innerIterator.next();
        //comparing for elements for SAME index of iteration
        //NOT comparing for element equality
        if(i==j) { continue; } 
        // else do stuff with a & b
    }
}

Equivalently: (and I think prettier)

int i=0;
for (Object a : objects) {
    int j=0;
    for (Object b : objects) {
      //comparing for elements for SAME index of iteration
      //NOT comparing for element equality
      if (i==j) { continue; }
      //else do stuf with a & b
      ++j;
    }
    ++i;
}

To Summarize:

If you want to check for shallow equality use a==b.

If you want to check for deep equality use a.equals(b).

If you want to check for index equality use i==j.

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