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I feel a bit silly for asking this question, but I feel like my code is as inefficient as it can be. I think I do not have the logic going on too well here.

Basically, I would like to have some different things happen on subsequently running the same commands.

My idea was to have a (cond ), in which for each case I have a test whether the command used before is the same AND the value of a variable which is set according to how many times it was pressed.

I also feel like I am not getting the title/tags correctly in this case, so feel free to edit.

((and (eq last-repeatable-command 'thecommand)
      (= varcounter 1))
  (message "second time called")
  (setq varcounter 2))

When it is pressed again, the next clause would fire.

While the code below works, I believe this could be done way more efficiently, and I hope someone can give directions on how to approach this problem.

Long code example:

(defun incremental-insert-o ()
  (interactive)
  ; init if not bound
  (when (not (boundp 'iivar)) (setq iivar 0))

  (cond 
   ((and (eq last-repeatable-command 'incremental-insert-o)
         (= iivar 1))
    (insert "o o ")
    (setq iivar 2))

   ((and (eq last-repeatable-command 'incremental-insert-o) 
         (= iivar 2))
    (insert "o o o ")
    (setq iivar 3))

   ((and (eq last-repeatable-command 'incremental-insert-o) 
         (= iivar 3))
    (insert "o o o "))

   (t 
     (insert "o ")
     (setq iivar 1)))
)

(global-set-key [f8] 'incremental-insert-o)
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1  
I don't think there's much you can change. Maybe use last-command (just because the name is shorter) and test against its value only once. Take a look at the source of cua-paste-pop. –  Dmitry Jan 13 '13 at 3:47
    
Yea, I took that in the last version :) I will want to use this structure more often in the future, so I should really get to it. –  PascalvKooten Jan 13 '13 at 10:02
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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Now, you're asking for more efficient code. There are a few things you could mean by this. You could mean that you want code that executes faster. How slow is the code now? When I run it on my Emacs, it's instant. Given that this code, by definition, is called from a buttonpress, it doesn't have to be super fast. Your code is more than fast enough for its use case, so I wouldn't worry about making it any faster. It also doesn't use memory: if you call it n times, it'll still only use enough memory to store one integer: this algorithm is O(1). Sounds good to me.

You could also mean "write this in fewer lines". This will also make the code less error-prone, and easier to understand. That's certainly a reasonable goal. Your code isn't awful to begin with, so it's not a necessity, but nor is it a bad idea. There are a few modifications we could make to your function. You could drop the entire third clause of your cond, and let the (= iivar 2) case be the final one, eliminating the need to set iivar to 3 there. Well, that's better already.

But wait, the function calls (eq last-repeatable-command 'incremental-insert-o) up to three times! That's a lot. Let me try to rewrite it! First, let's start with a base function definition, with an interactive call, as you have:

(defun incremental-insert-o ()
  (interactive))

Now, I'm going to restructure things from your code. First, let's see if we can keep track of iivar correctly. I'm going to rename that variable to incremental-insert-o-consecutive, for readability, and because Emacs Lisp has a single namespace, so anything else using a variable named iivar will read and write to the same place your code's looking at:

(defun incremental-insert-o ()
  (interactive)
  (if (eq last-repeatable-command 'incremental-insert-o)
      (setq incremental-insert-o-consecutive
            (1+ incremental-insert-o-consecutive))
    (setq incremental-insert-o-consecutive 
          1)))

Is that working? I'll bind it to [F8] as you did: (global-set-key [f8] 'incremental-insert-o). Now, hit [F8] to run it, but it doesn't tell you what the return value is. Let's change the function slightly to test it:

(defun incremental-insert-o ()
  (interactive)
  (if (eq last-repeatable-command 'incremental-insert-o)
      (setq incremental-insert-o-consecutive 
            (1+ incremental-insert-o-consecutive))
    (setq incremental-insert-o-consecutive 
          1))
  (message "incremental-insert-o-consecutive is currently %s" incremental-insert-o-consecutive))

Hit [F8] a few times to make sure it works, and it does! It starts at 1, increases by 1 each consecutive time it's called, and resets when you do something else. Now, we just need to print out the right message. What do we want to print? Well, the first time you call the function, print out one "o ", then the second time, print out "o o ", then the third and all other times, print "o o o ". Note that printing the second string is just printing the first string twice, and the third string is printing the first string three times:

(defun incremental-insert-o ()
  (interactive)
  (if (eq last-repeatable-command 'incremental-insert-o)
      (setq incremental-insert-o-consecutive 
            (1+ incremental-insert-o-consecutive))
    (setq incremental-insert-o-consecutive
          1))
  (dotimes (i incremental-insert-o-consecutive)
    (insert "o ")))

This is almost right! It does the right thing for times 1 through 3, but doesn't cap off at inserting "o o o "; it goes on to print "o o o o ", etc. So we just need to cap off the limit of repeats at 3:

(defun incremental-insert-o ()
  (interactive)
  (if (eq last-repeatable-command 'incremental-insert-o)
      (setq incremental-insert-o-consecutive
            (1+ incremental-insert-o-consecutive))
    (setq incremental-insert-o-consecutive
          1))
  (dotimes (i (min incremental-insert-o-consecutive
                   3))
    (insert "o ")))

Now, this seems to do exactly what you want. Let's look at the changes from the original function. This counts the number of repeats beyond 3. But the output behavior is the same, so I don't think this matters, and it seems nicer to keep the actual count of repeats. It will break if you ever overflow the integer, but that seems unlikely. Emacs guarantees at least 536870911 as MAXINT. So let's call that a day. We did get the code shorter, and have no repeated parts. I think that makes it more readable.

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I really like those "let me walk you through it" answers! I actually needed the code not to do incremental things, but different things at each variable value. I came up with an answer how I used it. –  PascalvKooten Jan 13 '13 at 10:11
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Here's something I could think of, however, take it with a grain of salt, because it may be overly complex, and you don't want to bring this much complexity into what you do:

(defstruct command-state
  action next-state)

(defmacro define-action-states (name condition &rest actions)
  (labels ((%make-command-state 
            (action name)
            `(make-command-state :action (lambda () ,action))))
    `(let ((head ,(%make-command-state (car actions) name)))
       (defvar ,name nil)
       (setq ,name head)
       ,@(loop for action in (cdr actions)
               collect
               `(setf (command-state-next-state ,name) 
                      ,(%make-command-state action name)
                      ,name (command-state-next-state ,name)))
       (setf (command-state-next-state ,name) head
             ,name head)
       (defun ,(intern (concat (symbol-name name) "-command")) ()
         (when ,condition
           (unwind-protect
               (funcall (command-state-action ,name))
             (setq ,name (command-state-next-state ,name))))))))

(define-action-states print-names (= 1 1)
    (message "first state")
    (message "second state")
    (message "third state")
    (message "fourth state"))

(print-names-command)
;; will print messages looping through them, 
;; each time you call it

I've made it to use a struct, so that you could add more conditions, independent of the state itself, for example, but mostly so the names would be more self-explanatory.

Also, probably, that's not the place you should really care about efficiency - so far your fingers cannot outrun the eLisp interpreter, it's all good ;)


Here's something I did to your code to possibly improve it a bit (now the worst case scenario will only check 5 conditions instead of 6 :)

(defun smart-killer ()
  (interactive)
  (let* ((properties (symbol-plist 'smart-killer))
         (counter (plist-get properties :counter)))
    (if (region-active-p)
        (kill-region (region-beginning) (region-end))
      (if (eq last-repeatable-command 'smart-killer)
          (if (> counter 3)
              (message "Kill ring is already filled with paragraph.")
            (if (> counter 2)
                (progn
                  (yank)
                  (kill-new "")
                  (mark-paragraph -1)
                  (kill-region (region-beginning) (region-end)))
              (if (> counter 1)
                  (kill-region (point) (line-beginning-position))
                (kill-line))))
        (when (not (looking-at "\\<\\|\\>")) (backward-word)) ; begin/end of word
        (kill-word 1))
      (plist-put properties :counter (mod (1+ counter) 5)))))

(put 'smart-killer :counter 0)
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I am sorry, it is quite out of my league at this point :/ Thanks for the effort though, perhaps it can be of use to others! –  PascalvKooten Jan 13 '13 at 10:15
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This is what I came up with in the end:

(defun smart-killer ()
  (interactive)

  (cond 
   ; [1]  If region active, kill region
   ((region-active-p)
    (kill-region (region-beginning) (region-end)))

   ; [2] If this command was last called, check how many times before it ran
   ((eq last-repeatable-command 'smart-killer)

      (cond
      ; [2a] 
       ((= sm-killer 1)
        (kill-line))

      ; [2b] 
       ((= sm-killer 2)
        (kill-region (point) (line-beginning-position)))

     ; [2c]
       ((= sm-killer 3)
        (yank)
        (kill-new "")
        (mark-paragraph -1)
        (kill-region (region-beginning) (region-end)))

     ; [2d]   
       ((= sm-killer 4)
        (message "Kill ring is already filled with paragraph.")))

      (incf sm-killer))

  ; [3]
  (t
   (when (not (looking-at "\\<\\|\\>")) (backward-word)) ; begin/end of word
   (kill-word 1)
   (setq sm-killer 1)))

)
share|improve this answer
    
For the sake of readability, I'd recommend you move the (incf sm-killer) lines out of the individual inner cond clauses, into the outer (eq last-repeatable-command 'smart-killer) clause. It'll make your code shorter, and it's one less thing to accidentally delete later. You don't need to check if 'sm-killer is bound, because the only time you check its value is when you're calling smart-killer for a second time. –  zck Jan 15 '13 at 0:08
    
Excellent comment! Really helpful. I will change it. –  PascalvKooten Jan 15 '13 at 0:57
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