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I read here it is possible to call another constructor http://stackoverflow.com/questions/829870/calling-constructor-from-other-constructor-in-same-class

But it calls the other constructor at the beginning, whereas I want to call at the end. Is this possible ?

Update for people asking for specific: In program.cs I want to be able, depending on some context, to do

either this:

// Form1 will show a message from its own private member
Application.Run(new Form1());

or this:

// Form1 will show a message from class1 member (kind of overloading form1 message if class1 exists)
Application.Run(new Form1(new Class1()));

I Form1 I have

private string member = "Test Sample if no class1";

In class1 I have

private string member = "Test Sample from class1";
public string member;
{
    get { return this.member; }
    set { this.member = value; }
}

In Form1 I have these 2 constructors

// of course Form1() could contain 100 lines of code
Form1() { MessageBox.Show(this.member); }

// I don't want to duplicate 100 lines in second constructor
// so I need to call first constructor
Form1(class1) {
    this.member = class1.member;
    // this is where I would now like to call Form1()
    // but the syntax below doesn't work
    this();
}
share|improve this question
1  
you could just try it –  Rich Seller Sep 15 '09 at 22:13
    
Is there any OO programming language that allows the user to dictate the sequence of constructors in the way that you want? I cringe that you're blaming C# for this whilst I don't know of any language that does it, at all. –  Jon Limjap Sep 16 '09 at 7:57
    
@Jon to be fair the OP doesn't appear to be blaming C# at all, just stating what they want to do and asking if it's possible. –  Rich Seller Sep 16 '09 at 8:11
    
He's blaming Microsoft in his comment at this answer: stackoverflow.com/questions/1429889/… –  Jon Limjap Sep 16 '09 at 8:35
    
You can't do it in C++ either --- parashift.com/c++-faq-lite/ctors.html#faq-10.3 –  Joel Goodwin Sep 16 '09 at 10:52

8 Answers 8

up vote 6 down vote accepted

No, the constructor mechanism is very clear and strict, you can only 'call' an other constructor before the one you are writing.

But you could use that to your advantage, just reverse your thinking (approach) to make the 'last' constructor the one the user calls. To work out the specifics, you will have to post some sample code.

Edit:

There are easy workarounds, like:

class Form1
{
   public Form1(Class1 c1)
   {
      if (c1 != null) this.member = c1.member;
   }

   public Form1() : this(null)
   {
   }
}

But you are not allowed to call a constructor form 'inside' another, this would create much more problems.

share|improve this answer
    
I have added code for the specific –  programmernovice Sep 15 '09 at 23:12

Not that I am aware of. You should probably move the initialization code that you need to perform last into a separate, private method and have that called from both constructors where appropriate.

share|improve this answer
    
In the context of what I want to do I can't see how it's possible I think, look at my code above. –  programmernovice Sep 15 '09 at 23:13
3  
Sure it is. Form1() { init(); } Form1(Class1 class1) { this.member = class1.member; init(); } private void init() { MessageBox.Show(this.member); } –  Samir Talwar Sep 15 '09 at 23:51
    
I think that's the only solution finally but I wonder why they didn't allow to call default constructor as creating another init function is artificial and requires refactor the code. –  programmernovice Sep 16 '09 at 7:02

No, if you use constructor chaining, the base class constructor is always called first.

share|improve this answer

As others have already explained, this just isn't how it works. For your particular case, I would probably do this:

Form1() : this(null)
{
}

Form1(Class1 class1)
{
    if (class1 != null)
    {
        this.member = class1.member;
    }

    ...
    MessageBox.Show(this.member);
    ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
That's good but what if I want to extend parameter by passing another class, I would have to change Form1 also. –  programmernovice Sep 16 '09 at 6:59
2  
@programmernovice: Yes, you would, but in general constructors are used only for basic initialisation of the object, not complex functionality. So you would do all needed initialisation in the most complete (and probably most common) constructor, and then chain the other constructors to that. If you later add more parameters that can be sent to constructor, that would be a new constructor chaining to the original, but with the additional parameter (and it would probably be a result of bad planning...). –  awe Sep 16 '09 at 7:59
    
Well if my constructor is about generating visual components dynamically I have no choice than doing that in a constructor. –  programmernovice Sep 19 '09 at 8:04

The shared logic is placed in the ConstructorFinished method.

Form1() {
  // Call the method to do the logic
  ConstructorFinished();
}



void ConstructorFinished()
{
   MessageBox.Show(this.member);
}



Form1(class1) {
    this.member = class1.member;

    // Call the method to do the logic
    ConstructorFinished();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yes but I can't see why Microsoft didn't allow to call default constructor as creating another function which acts as defaut constructor is artificial useless complicating the syntax. –  programmernovice Sep 16 '09 at 7:05
1  
If you could call constructor bodies like normal methods, it'd make things hellish to maintain. It's much harder to reason about code that differs its behaviour based on order, especially when you will (inevitably) get people using it in different and esoteric ways. It is often a sign that something is wrong if you have a lot of complicated code running in a constructor. –  Mark Simpson Sep 17 '09 at 12:14

In the general case, no. It's not a feature supported either by the C# language or the CLR.

In your specific case, just follow the pattern Microsoft have already given you with the designer code. If it's good enough for them...

public Form1() {
    InitializeComponent();
    InitializeComponentEx();
    MessageBox.Show(this.member);
}

public Form1(T class1) {
    this.member = class1.member;
    InitializeComponent();
    InitializeComponentEx();
}

private void InitializeComponentEx() {
    // my 100 lines of code
}
share|improve this answer

The general solution for this is to put your standard initialisation code in a main constructor, then use the other constructors to pass into it. Since you're only setting a string, you'd do something like this:

private const string DefaultValue = "some default value";
private string member;

Form1() : this(DefaultValue)
{

}

Form1(string overloadedStringAhoy) 
{
    this.member = overloadedStringAhoy;
}

If you call the default constructor (Form1()) you will simply pass through to the overloaded constructor with a default value for the name.

I tend to avoid these kinds of constructors, as complicating them with "oh this has to happen in this order and that won't be set" logic can make maintenance harder. If you encounter this a lot, tread carefully. :)

In this case, it's a trivial setup and the code isn't going to get too complicated and it'll do what you need, so it's OK I guess. If you ever find yourself having to special case + pass through a lot of initialisation code, it's often a lot nicer to use a simple factory or builder class. This way, you keep your class constructor code as simple as possible and leave the wiring to the factory/builder.

share|improve this answer
    
No I'm not only setting one string, this is just an example, the solution should be general. –  programmernovice Sep 16 '09 at 6:45
    
@programmernovice - It is general. Form1(string overloadedStringAhoy) can include as many parameters as you like of any type, not just the one string overloadedStringAhoy. –  awe Sep 16 '09 at 8:12
    
@programmernovice: This is a general solution; my answer is also 'just an example'. You should be able to extrapolate from the example. As I said, if you have more complicated construction logic, look into the factory + builder patterns. Using these patterns, you can use a simple (read: one simple) constructor and parametrise it using the factory/builder. I'd suggest updating your question if this doesn't satisfy you. –  Mark Simpson Sep 17 '09 at 12:19
    
OK thanks will look at factory –  programmernovice Sep 19 '09 at 8:01

I don't see why the answers from people here can't be used in your case. And that does not rely on the complexity in your constructor.

There are 2 approaches you can use:

Perfect answer by Pavel Minaev that solves your problem by chaining constructors.
This approach can be used if your call is not "in the middle" of something.

Perfect answer by Christian Hayter that solves your problem by moving common initializing to a separate method that is called in all constructors. That way you can do whatever you like in the different constructors.

share|improve this answer
    
The answers are ok, I will have to choose one. –  programmernovice Sep 19 '09 at 8:05

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