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I saw this in a textbook, but the book doesn't explain what it actually does, and why I should do this. Here is something similar to the example in the book:

 class MyClass
 {
      public:
           MyClass(int initial_capacity = 20);
      private:
           int capacity;
 }

I can't use initial_capacity in the implementation, I can't even implement anything, so I am confused as to what this is for? Does it set capacity to 20 somehow? How is this a default constructor?

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Which part of it don't you understand? Are you familar with the use of default arguments in other functions? –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 13 '13 at 0:26
    
I wasn't understanding what the int initial_capacity = 20 after MyClass( did, but the four below answered my questions very well already. Thanks! –  KKendall Jan 13 '13 at 6:37

4 Answers 4

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Probably, there is missed implementation of constructor. For example, if constructor looks like this one :

MyClass(int initial_capacity = 20) {
     capacity = initial_capacity;
}

If you create object this way:

MyClass a(10);

capacity will be set to 10. On the other hand, if you will create object like this:

MyClass a;

capacity will be set to 20.

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6  
I think the details for the constructor implementation are implied in the OP. Of course, explicitly stating them certainly makes it more clear. Also, an initializer list is the preferred way to write this constructor. –  Code-Apprentice Jan 12 '13 at 23:37
1  
For nontrivial members you would want to use the MyClass(int initial_capacity = 20) : capacity(initial_capacity) {} syntax. –  Neil Jan 12 '13 at 23:45

This is a constructor with a default parameter. It means that you can either call it with a number, or without a number. If you call it without a number, it is the same as if you called with the number 20.

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MyClass(int initial_capacity = 20);

This syntax provides a default value for the initial_capacity parameter. Note that you can do this with parameters for any function, not just with constructors. Default parameter values are helpful because it allows you to do both

MyClass c(5);

and

MyClass c;

In the later, the default value is used.

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It serves as a default value for initial_capacity if the user chooses not to put in a value. So in essence it takes the place of 2 constructors: one that takes an integer MyClass(int); and one that doesn't take any parameters MyClass(); which will be 20.

Assuming that you are going to use that to set a value to capacity, there are two ways to use it . . .

either in your .cpp file

#include "<...>.h"

MyClass::MyClass(int initial_capacity)
{
    capacity = initial_capacity;
}

or you can elect to do it straight from your .h file

class MyClass
{
     public:
          MyClass(int initial_capacity = 20) 
               : capacity(initial_capacity) // member initialization list
          {}
     private:
          int capacity;
};

This shorthand which is preceded by the semicolon is called a member initialization list.

Be aware though, that calling it this way may get you into trouble because it will automatically create a parameterless constructor for you.

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Those two code snippets are not equivalent. –  Konrad Rudolph Jan 13 '13 at 0:00
    
Thanks for the catch . . . my bad –  rbtLong Jan 13 '13 at 0:12
    
Why do you not use the ctor-initializer in the first example? Also, "initialization list" is ambiguous. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 13 '13 at 0:27
    
Does it make a difference? I can switch it if you want. –  rbtLong Jan 13 '13 at 0:48
1  
Really? I think it would be more natural for someone new learning C++ to learn how to implement the constructor in the .cpp file before learning the shorthand. This is why I ordered it this way. But honestly I don't think it is that imperative. –  rbtLong Jan 13 '13 at 16:43

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