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I am not sure if I can post here these types of questions, please let me know what you think and I can delete the post if necessary.

I am experimenting with some C style code but I am having trouble finding my bugg. Can anyone see the mistake?

Note: I know there's few memory leaks ( i will fix later)

#include <cstdlib>
#include <iostream>
#include <string.h>

using namespace std;

size_t returnSize(const char* s)
{
       string string(s);
       return string.size();
};

size_t returnSize(const int& i)
{
       return sizeof(i);
};

size_t returnSize(const char& c)
{
    return sizeof(char);   
};

template<typename T>
string Serialize(const T& t)
{
    T* pt = new T(t);
    char CasttoChar[returnSize(t)];
    for (int i =0 ;i<returnSize(t);i++)
    {
        CasttoChar[i] = (reinterpret_cast<const char*>(pt)[i]);
    }

    char* pX = (char*)malloc(sizeof(char) * (returnSize(t) + 1));

    // I save size in byte 0 
    pX[0] = (char)returnSize(t);

    //I save value in subsequent bytes.
    for (int i = 1 ; i<=returnSize(t) ; i++)
    { 
        pX[i] = CasttoChar[i];                         
    }

    string returnString(pX);
    free(pX);

    return returnString;     
};
template<typename T>
T DeSerialize(const string& s)
{
     const char * cstr = s.c_str();

     int sizeofData = (int)cstr[0];

    char* cp = (char*)malloc(sizeof(char) * sizeofData);
    for (int i =0 ;i<sizeofData;i++)
    { 
        cp[i] = cstr[i];                          
    }

    T* result= reinterpret_cast<T*>(cp);

    return *result;

}
int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    int x = 10;
    string s = Serialize(x);
    cout << DeSerialize<int>(s);
  /*    
    I need to see: 
    10 as output
    now I see 4
  */    
    system("PAUSE");
    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

So basically I serialize number 10 and when I deserialize it I get 4.

share|improve this question

closed as too localized by Oliver Charlesworth, melpomene, PreferenceBean, Carl Norum, Blastfurnace Jan 13 '13 at 0:10

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Asking people to spot errors in your code is not productive. You should use the debugger (or add print statements) to isolate the problem, and then construct a minimal test-case. – Oliver Charlesworth Jan 13 '13 at 0:01
    
You say that you have a bug, but haven't explained what the bug is. – Steve Jan 13 '13 at 0:03
    
Ah I agree totally, Unfortuantely I am working on a PC that is very very old and installing a debugger is not working for me. – Kam Jan 13 '13 at 0:03
    
The bug is that instead of seeing 10 I see 4 in output – Kam Jan 13 '13 at 0:04
1  
Nope, this ain't find-my-bug.com! – PreferenceBean Jan 13 '13 at 0:05

You are copying the wrong bytes:

for (int i =0 ;i<sizeofData;i++)
{ 
    cp[i] = cstr[i];                          
}

Since cstr[0] is the length, it should be:

for (int i =0 ;i<sizeofData;i++)
{ 
    cp[i] = cstr[i+1];                          
}

[Also, you need to make SURE that your strings never exceed the size of 128!]

Oh, and further: Passing a char* into a std::string assumes that your string is a C-style string. So if you have a zero-byte in your string, it won't work. May be better to have a data-structure that is just a length and a dynamically allocated char-array.

I also believe you will copy the wrong bytes from a std::string type, since you are simply casting the address of the string to a char *, and that's the "object std::string", not the actual string content - you need "c_str()" for that.

share|improve this answer

One source of bug:

string s = Serialize(x);

should be

string s = Serialize<int>(x);
share|improve this answer
1  
Eh? Why? The compiler should be able to sort that out. – Mats Petersson Jan 13 '13 at 0:11

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