Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

So there's two developers on my project, me and the other guy. The other guy is doing most of the coding and I wanted to use Github to store our code. This lead to the install of Egit for eclipse. We're both working on Windows.

He is able to do commits and pushes to the remote repository no problem. I can see that changes have been made with the little down arrow thingy in the project name (after I've done a fetch).

I cannot do a merge. I get Checkout conflict: Your local changes to blah blah blah.

I haven't touched the code. Does anyone know how I might do a merge force from within the Eclipse plugin?

I also wouldn't hate answers to the following question:

What is the difference between Commit, Push to Upstream, Fetch from Upstream, Fetch, Push, Merge and Synchronize workspace.

share|improve this question
up vote 0 down vote accepted

If you haven't edited the code and are running into merge conflicts when pulling right away, it's most likely because you've versioned files which your IDE is automatically modifying. This probably includes local, user-specific configuration files that are not actually part of the source code.

What is the difference between Commit, Push to Upstream, Fetch from Upstream, Fetch, Push, Merge and Synchronize workspace.

You probably want to familiarize yourself with git itself first. All of those, except for "synchronize workspace", are git commands, and you can find the documentation for them on the website.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, that sounds quite likely. I hadn't thought of the IDE making its own changes. As to the other question, I was really hoping not to have to know more about git than I wanted (the documentation is rather verbose) but I'll just live with it and spend the time. :-) – Joshua Gramlich Jan 13 '13 at 2:06
    
Git is as powerful and flexible as it is complicated (comparatively to e.g. SVN or Mercurial)... you may run into problems when using it without fully understanding the basic principles. You could check other git resources such as intro/tutorial videos rather than going through the official documentation. – Vladimir Panteleev Jan 13 '13 at 2:08

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.