Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I created a little script to handle responsive design for for lower resolution devices and to show a toggle menu instead of a full width menu. The following script is working fine for me but this looks little bit messy to me. What shorthands or practices should I need to make this code more minimalistic and efficient?

resetMenu() function is handling to retain css for particular resolution while browser resizes from normal mode to toggle mode, Is it a good practice to do so?

$(document).ready(function($) {
function resetMenu() {
    $('#top-menu li, #search-form, .social').css({"display":"block"});
    $('#top-menu li').css({"display":"inline-block"});
};
$(window).resize(function () { 
if($(window).width() > 640){
    $(resetMenu());
}
else{
    $('#top-menu li, #search-form, .social').css({"display":"none"}).fadeOut(1000);
    $('#top-menu li:nth-child(2)').css({"display":"none"});
}
});

$(".togglebutton").toggle(
function () {
    if($(window).height() < 360){
        $('#top-menu li').css({"display":"inline-block"}).fadeIn(500);
        $('#top-menu li:nth-child(2)').css({"display":"none"});
        $('#search-form, .social').css({"display":"block"}).fadeIn(500);
        $('#top-menu li').css({"border":"none"});
    }
    else{
        $('#top-menu li, #search-form, .social').css({"display":"block"}).fadeIn(1000);
        $('#top-menu li:nth-child(2)').css({"display":"none"});
    }
},
function () {
    $('#top-menu li, #search-form, .social').css({"display":"none"}).fadeOut(1000);
    $('#top-menu li:nth-child(2)').css({"display":"none"});
}

)});
share|improve this question

closed as too localized by Alexander, Waleed Khan, RobB, Sparky, Anand Jan 13 '13 at 6:55

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
One thing I would recommend is caching your selectors. Continually calling $('#top-menu li') can cause a performance strain. Also, it's quicker to call $('#top-menu').find('li'). –  Syon Jan 13 '13 at 3:07
1  
Call resetMenu() directly, don't wrap it in $(). And take #top-menu li out of the selector in the first line in resetMenu(), becase the second line of the function changes the same CSS property of those elements. –  nnnnnn Jan 13 '13 at 3:09
1  
Proper indentation should come before minimalistic. –  Waleed Khan Jan 13 '13 at 3:20

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I normally prefer code which has the declaration and execution parts on different modules so, one part would be:

var one = $('#top-menu li')
var two = $('#top-menu li, #search-form, .social');
var three = $('#top-menu li:nth-child(2)');
var four = $('#search-form, .social')

function toggleIn() {
    if($(window).height() < 360){
        one.css({"display":"inline-block"}).fadeIn(500);
        three.css({"display":"none"});
        four.css({"display":"block"}).fadeIn(500);
        one.css({"border":"none"});
    }
    else{
        two.css({"display":"block"}).fadeIn(1000);
        three.css({"display":"none"});
    }
},

function toggleOut() {
    two.css({"display":"none"}).fadeOut(1000);
    three.css({"display":"none"});
}

function resetMenu() {
    one.css({"display":"block"});
    two.css({"display":"inline-block"});
};

And the other just:

$(window).resize(function () { 
    if($(window).width() > 640){
        $(resetMenu());
    }
    else{
        two.css({"display":"none"}).fadeOut(1000);
        three.css({"display":"none"});
    }
});

 $(".togglebutton").toggle(toggleIn, toggleOut);

So, how I see it, that second part would be your "minimalistic" code. And each functional part of the code can be separately evaluated, useful for debbugin purposes.

share|improve this answer

I don't think that your code is really all that messy. If you wanted to though you could define and name those anonymous functions elsewhere and pass them into the event handlers. You might define an object which is responsible for tracking windows properties and then you could move your response functions into that object. The WindowTracker, or whatever you call it, could then implement the builder and/or observer pattern such that if you end up adding more to your event handlers you can do it in such a way as to allow for separation of concerns and more modular code.

I don't know if that would be more minimal but it might be readable and logical. If you're looking for efficiency you probably should store the results of your jquery searches, at least internally for the function calls. How to save jquery selector for later use

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.