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I have tried getting value of global variable from .m to another .m in 2 ways :

Firstly, I tried to import the viewController.m class in another .m class and tried to retrieve the value but I received a linker error.

Secondly, I simply created extern with the string name and then it started working perfectly.

My question is Why import gave me the error and how extern variable recognizes the string name from that particular class ?
( ie : What if I had 2 or 3 variables with the same name in different classes and I type extern and string name which value would I get since I am not importing any class.)

And, Add-on question : When DO you really import the class ?

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Get a book on the "c" language and study it. You need to understand "c" in order to use objective-c. objective-c is just an extension of "c", a strict superset. These questions are just rather simple "c" questions. –  zaph Jan 13 '13 at 4:01
    
Basically If I create a method/props I need to import that into another class to get the value inside the method. If I use extern command it will show the latest value of that variable in the entire app right .Atleast thats what I tested the code out and checked . I have worked in java and use dot operator to connect with other class variables looks like its little different out here.Till now I was working on the viewcontoller class itself without using any other class now I would like to transfer values between other classes. –  Jacob Wood Jan 13 '13 at 4:11

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You really import a class when you need access to it's properties and methods. That might have sounded too obvious, but that's what it really is. Classes are OOP's encapsulation concept personified.

Getting a variable from one point to another can be done in many ways, one could use the userdefaults facility, you could have the variable within the app delegate and then access the value in different classes or you could expose a property on your destination view controller and have the source view controller set that property before transitioning to the destination..to name a few. There are many more methods that are right and wrong depending on the scenario.

Importing a view controller A into another view controller B, simply to have access to a value in A seems like overkill (if not flat out an inappropriate use of the importing mechanism).

This question explains externs further, I have no exposure to them,

Objective-C static, extern, public variables

Hope this helps.

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Basically If I create a method/props I need to import that into another class to get the value inside the method. If I use extern command it will show the latest value of that variable in the entire app right .Atleast thats what I tested the code out and checked . I have worked in java and use dot operator to connect with other class variables looks like its little different out here.Till now I was working on the viewcontoller class itself without using any other class now I would like to transfer values between other classes. –  Jacob Wood Jan 13 '13 at 4:11
    
Thanks for the link I am creating the example now. –  Jacob Wood Jan 13 '13 at 4:17
    
One approach you can use is to observe the value of the property using key value observing, so when the original is changed you will get a delegate method call. Assuming that A is your first vc with the string and B is the one you want to send it to. You would do something like [A addObserver:b forKeyPath:@"interestingString"...] and then in B implement - (void)observeValueForKeyPath.. For the actual signatures look up KVO on developer.apple.com. Does this help? –  Nikhil Varma Jan 13 '13 at 4:20
    
Thanks Nikhil . Help me out with this . I have created a method in viewcontroller called -(void)check; where the value within the method is NSString *test=@"check"; I imported the viewcontoller in 2 view controller and now How do I get the variable from that method ?? –  Jacob Wood Jan 13 '13 at 4:29
1  
Since I can't see your whole code I am unsure of the context but this is one way to do what you asked. In vc1.h +(NSString *)getMyString; In vc1.m +(NSString *)getMyString { return @"check"; } in vc2.h #import "vc1.h" in vc2.m - (void)someFunction { NSLog(@"Here is the string: %@",[vc1 getMyString]); } –  Nikhil Varma Jan 13 '13 at 4:32

Firstly, I tried to import the viewController.m class in another .m class and tried to retrieve the value but I received a linker error.

You NEVER import a .m (implementation) file. You only ever import .h (header) files.

My question is Why import gave me the error

In C, there is a rule that any (non-static) global function or variable with a certain name must be defined only once. For a variable, writing its type and name defines it. For a function, the implementation defines it. Thus, having global functions or variables of the same name in two different code files will fail. They will conflict.

Importing a file means take the entire source of the file and insert it there. When you "import" A.m into B.m, the entire source of A.m is inserted into B.m. That means every declaration in A.m now shows up in two code files in your program -- A.m and B.m, hence the error.

You can declare (but not define) a global variable or function more than once. You can declare a variable by using extern without defining it. Declaring it with extern allows you to use a variable even though it is not actually declared in the same code file.

and how extern variable recognizes the string name from that particular class ? ( ie : What if I had 2 or 3 variables with the same name in different classes and I type extern and string name which value would I get since I am not importing any class.)

As explained above, you can only have one non-static global variable with a given name in your program. It would be an error to have variables with the same name in different files. It is possible for non-static global variables and functions to be accessible from any other part of the program, by its name (and it works through the magic of linking).


Generally, the best practice for a global variable that will be used in many files, is to define it in a .m file (as you're doing), and the declare it extern in the .h file corresponding to that .m file. Then other files that import that header will automatically have access to that variable.

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Thanks newacct.That was really great explanation.It helped .So What I am doing is right ? Also I had declared the variable in viewDIdLoad() and now I am doing it in viewDidAppear and its working perfect. I also created a method and executing that method from another .m class which in-turn returns a string as per the previous discussions in this post .Even that is good ? –  Jacob Wood Jan 14 '13 at 8:39

I know this has already been answered in detail, but I just want to offer some clarification.

Declare data that you want to keep private in your .m file. For data that you want to make accessible to other objects, declare in your header .h file. Use properties for all your declarations:

  //myViewController.h
  @interface myViewController: UIViewController

  @property (assign) int myInt;
  @property (strong) NSString* someString;

  @end

You can access these properties from another object by passing a message to myViewController:

  [myViewController setMyInt:20];    //setter
  [myViewController someString];    //getter

Or you can use the equivalent dot notation

  myViewController.myInt = 20;
  myViewController.someString;

(you need to #include "myViewController.h" in any object that wants access to these)

Inside myViewController you access them using 'self':

  self.myInt;
  self.someString;

This is mediated access via the setter/getter. The backing variable can be accessed directly from inside myViewController (but not from any other object) as _myInt, _someString. This is not advised outside of init and dealloc methods.

A property encapsulates declaration of instance variables and creation of default getters and setters, so you do not need to make a separate variable declaration, and you only need to make your own accessors if you need to change the default behaviour.

Please also refer to my answer here:
Should I declare variables in interface or using property in objective-c arc?

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Thanks He Was. As per the question I got two answers 1 is using a method and executing it from another .m class to get a return type. 2. TO have extern variable . As per your answer I created : @property (strong) NSString* someString; and included .h file but the error states that the property not found on the object type ViewController ? –  Jacob Wood Jan 14 '13 at 8:58

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