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I am trying to solve an online judge problem: http://opc.iarcs.org.in/index.php/problems/LEAFEAT

The problem in short:

If we are given an integer L and a set of N integers s1,s2,s3..sN, we have to find how many numbers there are from 0 to L-1 which are not divisible by any of the 'si's.

For example, if we are given, L = 20 and S = {3,2,5} then there are 6 numbers from 0 to 19 which are not divisible by 3,2 or 5.

L <= 1000000000 and N <= 20.

I used the Inclusion-Exclusion principle to solve this problem:

/*Let 'T' be the number of integers that are divisible by any of the 'si's in the 
given range*/

for i in range 1 to N
  for all subsets A of length i
    if i is odd then:
      T += 1 + (L-1)/lcm(all the elements of A)
    else
      T -= 1 + (L-1)/lcm(all the elements of A)
return T

Here is my code to solve this problem

#include <stdio.h>

int N;
long long int L;
int C[30];

typedef struct{int i, key;}subset_e;
subset_e A[30];
int k;

int gcd(a,b){
int t;
    while(b != 0){
            t = a%b;
            a = b;
            b = t;
    }

    return a;
}

long long int lcm(int a, int b){
    return (a*b)/gcd(a,b);
}

long long int getlcm(int n){
  if(n == 1){
    return A[0].key;
  }
  int  i;
  long long int rlcm = lcm(A[0].key,A[1].key);
  for(i = 2;i < n; i++){
    rlcm = lcm(rlcm,A[i].key);
  }
  return rlcm;
}

int next_subset(int n){
  if(k == n-1 && A[k].i == N-1){
    if(k == 0){
      return 0;
    }
    k--;
  }
  while(k < n-1 && A[k].i == A[k+1].i-1){
    if(k <= 0){
      return 0;
    }
    k--;
  }
  A[k].key = C[A[k].i+1];
  A[k].i++;
  return 1;
}

int main(){
  int i,j,add;
  long long int sum = 0,g,temp;
  scanf("%lld%d",&L,&N);
  for(i = 0;i < N; i++){
    scanf("%d",&C[i]);
  }
  for(i = 1; i <= N; i++){
    add = i%2;
    for(j = 0;j < i; j++){
      A[j].key = C[j];
      A[j].i = j;
    }
    temp = getlcm(i);
    g = 1 + (L-1)/temp;
    if(add){
      sum += g;
    } else {
      sum -= g;
    }
    k = i-1;
    while(next_subset(i)){
      temp = getlcm(i);
      g = 1 + (L-1)/temp;
      if(add){
        sum += g;
      } else {
        sum -= g;
      }
    }
  }
  printf("%lld",L-sum);
  return 0;
}

The next_subset(n) generates the next subset of size n in the array A, if there is no subset it returns 0 otherwise it returns 1. It is based on the algorithm described by the accepted answer in this stackoverflow question.

The lcm(a,b) function returns the lcm of a and b. The get_lcm(n) function returns the lcm of all the elements in A. It uses the property : LCM(a,b,c) = LCM(LCM(a,b),c)

When I submit the problem on the judge it gives my a 'Time Limit Exceeded'. If we solve this using brute force we get only 50% of the marks.

As there can be upto 2^20 subsets my algorithm might be slow, hence I need a better algorithm to solve this problem.

EDIT:

After editing my code and changing the function to the Euclidean algorithm, I am getting a wrong answer, but my code runs within the time limit. It gives me a correct answer to the example test but not to any other test cases; here is a link to ideone where I ran my code, the first output is correct but the second is not.

Is my approach to this problem correct? If it is then I have made a mistake in my code, and I'll find it; otherwise can anyone please explain what is wrong?

share|improve this question
1  
+1 for providing this site with so many interesting problems. To the job! –  Theocharis K. Jan 13 '13 at 3:59
1  
The lcm and gcd function should take a, b as long long. –  nhahtdh Jan 13 '13 at 4:58

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You could also try changing your lcm function to use the Euclidean algorithm.

int gcd(int a, int b) {
    int t;

    while (b != 0) {
        t = b;
        b = a % t;
        a = t;
    }

    return a;
}

int lcm(int a, int b) {
    return (a * b) / gcd(a, b);
}

At least with Python, the speed differences between the two are pretty large:

>>> %timeit lcm1(103, 2013)
100000 loops, best of 3: 9.21 us per loop
>>> %timeit lcm2(103, 2013)
1000000 loops, best of 3: 1.02 us per loop
share|improve this answer
    
thanks for your answer –  A.06 Jan 13 '13 at 4:15
    
After implementing the method you described, i am within the time limit but i am getting a wrong answer, i'll edit the question and add the new code –  A.06 Jan 13 '13 at 4:36
1  
@A.06: See my answer for the C translation. It'll probably work. –  Blender Jan 13 '13 at 4:41
1  
@A.06: The logic in the while loop is a little different (at least at first glance). Can you test that your implementation is correct? –  Blender Jan 13 '13 at 4:44
1  
@A.06 I think the wrong answer is due to adding 1 for the 0, but you don't need that. Then compute L-1 - sum, since there are only L-1 numbers 1 <= k < L. –  Daniel Fischer Jan 13 '13 at 5:17

Typically, the lowest common multiple of a subset of k of the s_i will exceed L for k much smaller than 20. So you need to stop early.

Probably, just inserting

if (temp >= L) {
    break;
}

after

while(next_subset(i)){
  temp = getlcm(i);

will be sufficient.

Also, shortcut if there are any 1s among the s_i, all numbers are divisible by 1.

I think the following will be faster:

unsigned gcd(unsigned a, unsigned b) {
    unsigned r;
    while(b) {
        r = a%b;
        a = b;
        b = r;
    }
    return a;
}

unsigned recur(unsigned *arr, unsigned len, unsigned idx, unsigned cumul, unsigned bound) {
    if (idx >= len || bound == 0) {
        return bound;
    }
    unsigned i, g, s = arr[idx], result;
    g = s/gcd(cumul,s);
    result = bound/g;
    for(i = idx+1; i < len; ++i) {
        result -= recur(arr, len, i, cumul*g, bound/g);
    }
    return result;
}

unsigned inex(unsigned *arr, unsigned len, unsigned bound) {
    unsigned i, result = bound, t;
    for(i = 0; i < len; ++i) {
        result -= recur(arr, len, i, 1, bound);
    }
    return result;
}

call it with

unsigned S[N] = {...};
inex(S, N, L-1);

You need not add the 1 for the 0 anywhere, since 0 is divisible by all numbers, compute the count of numbers 1 <= k < L which are not divisible by any s_i.

share|improve this answer
    
After trying you method, there isn't much difference, i stil get Time Limit Exceeded –  A.06 Jan 13 '13 at 4:22
1  
Ah, pity. But I didn't even look at your lcm implementation, if you use the Euclidean algorithm, as Blender suggests, that should make it significantly faster on average. And I'll suggest another approach to the inclusion-exclusion, which I think will be faster than your next_subset. –  Daniel Fischer Jan 13 '13 at 4:33
    
@A.06 Took a while to fix an off-by-one error, sorry. –  Daniel Fischer Jan 13 '13 at 5:17
    
Thanks its working correctly. –  A.06 Jan 13 '13 at 5:18

Create an array of flags with L entries. Then mark each touched leaf:

for(each size in list of sizes) {
    length = 0;
    while(length < L) {
        array[length] = TOUCHED;
        length += size;
    }
}

Then find the untouched leaves:

for(length = 0; length < L; length++) {
    if(array[length] != TOUCHED) { /* Untouched leaf! */ }
}

Note that there is no multiplication and no division involved; but you will need up to about 1 GiB of RAM. If RAM is a problem the you can use an array of bits (max. 120 MiB).

This is only a beginning though, as there are repeating patterns that can be copied instead of generated. The first pattern is from 0 to S1*S2, the next is from 0 to S1*S2*S3, the next is from 0 to S1*S2*S3*S4, etc.

Basically, you can set all values touched by S1 and then S2 from 0 to S1*S2; then copy the pattern from 0 to S1*S2 until you get to S1*S2*S3 and set all the S3's between S3 and S1*S2*S3; then copy that pattern until you get to S1*S2*S3*S4 and set all the S4's between S4 and S1*S2*S3*S4 and so on.

Next; if S1*S2*...Sn is smaller than L, you know the pattern will repeat and can generate the results for lengths from S1*S2*...Sn to L from the pattern. In this case the size of the array only needs to be S1*S2*...Sn and doesn't need to be L.

Finally, if S1*S2*...Sn is larger than L; then you could generate the pattern for S1*S2*...(Sn-1) and use that pattern to create the results from S1*S2*...(Sn-1) to S1*S2*...Sn. In this case if S1*S2*...(Sn-1) is smaller than L then the array doesn't need to be as large as L.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks but i already tried that too, i did it with a bitset, yet the size of L didn't also the memory limits of the problem is 3mb or something –  A.06 Jan 13 '13 at 5:29
    
Heh - OK - let me try something else then! :-) –  Brendan Jan 13 '13 at 5:37

I'm afraid your problem understanding is maybe not correct.

You have L. You have a set S of K elements. You must count the sum of quotient of L / Si. For L = 20, K = 1, S = { 5 }, the answer is simply 16 (20 - 20 / 5). But K > 1, so you must consider the common multiples also.

Why loop through a list of subsets? It doesn't involve subset calculation, only division and multiple.

You have K distinct integers. Each number could be a prime number. You must consider common multiples. That's all.

EDIT

L = 20 and S = {3,2,5}

Leaves could be eaten by 3 = 6
Leaves could be eaten by 2 = 10
Leaves could be eaten by 5 = 4

Common multiples of S, less than L, not in S = 6, 10, 15

Actually eaten leaves = 20/3 + 20/2 + 20/5 - 20/6 - 20/10 - 20/15 = 6

share|improve this answer
    
I can solve this in another way, but all of them involve looping L times which is not fast enough because of the size of K. –  A.06 Jan 13 '13 at 4:57
    
Problem want you to investigate basic integer theory not set theory. Loop design, algorithm to loop is not the point. –  9dan Jan 13 '13 at 5:03
    
I did not understand what you mean, but if we loop L times anywhere in our code we get a TLE, i have tried that. –  A.06 Jan 13 '13 at 5:06

You can keep track of the distance until then next touched leaf for each size. The distance to the next touched leaf will be whichever distance happens to be smallest, and you'd subtract this distance from all the others (and wrap whenever the distance is zero).

For example:

 int sizes[4] = {2, 5, 7, 9};
 int distances[4];
 int currentLength = 0;

 for(size = 0 to 3) {
     distances[size] = sizes[size];
 }

 while(currentLength < L) {
     smallest = INT_MAX;
     for(size = 0 to 3) {
         if(distances[size] < smallest) smallest = distances[size];
     }
     for(size = 0 to 3) {
         distances[size] -= smallest;
         if(distances[size] == 0) distances[size] = sizes[size];
     }
     while( (smallest > 1) && (currentLength < L) ) {
         currentLength++;
         printf("%d\n", currentLength;
         smallest--;
     }
 }
share|improve this answer
    
thanks for your answer. –  A.06 Jan 13 '13 at 5:49

@A.06: u r the one with username linkinmew on opc, rite?

Anyways, the answer just requires u to make all possible subsets, and then apply inclusion exclusion principle. This will fall well within the time bounds for the data given. For making all possible subsets, u can easily define a recursive function.

share|improve this answer
    
yes i am linkinmew –  A.06 Jan 15 '13 at 2:07
1  
I hope u try ur best to solve the problems on your own before asking, since u have asked about almost every good question on opc. Cheers! –  Intelligence Jan 15 '13 at 9:58

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