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I have a series of files with yaml headers followed by markdown subtitles, looking something like this:

Minimal example input file:

---
layout: post
tags: 
  - might 
  - be
  - variable 
  - number 
  - of 
  - these
category: ecology
---



my (h2 size) title
------------------

some text


possible other titles we don't want
-----------------------------------

more text more text

As I've tried to indicate, the size of the YAML header and the line on which the first subtitle appears varies, so I can't count on knowing the line numbers for any change ahead of time. I'd like to identify the first title (which should also be the first non-blank text following the closing ---. I'd then like to write that text into the YAML header like so, the tile we grabbed removed from the body text, and the rest of the text remaining intact:

Target Output file

---
layout: post
tags: 
  - might 
  - be
  - variable 
  - number 
  - of 
  - these
categories: ecology
title: my (h2 size) title
---



some text

possible other titles we don't want
-----------------------------------

more text more text

Seems like this should be a reasonable task for sed/awk or such, but my usage of these tools is quite elementary and I haven't been able to puzzled this one out.

I see I can search between words, sed 'word1/,/word2/p, but not sure how to convert this to search between the second occurrence of ^---$ and the first occurrence of ^----+-$ (line with greater than 3 dashes); how to then drop the extra blank lines and then paste into the yaml matter above.

Perhaps with so many steps perl would be a better choice than sed, but one where I have even less familiarity. Thanks for any hints or advice.

share|improve this question
    
This is absolutely, unquestionably NOT an appropriate application for sed. sed is an excellent tool for simple substitutions on a single line but for anything else you should use awk, perl, ruby, etc. A sed solution to this would be an incomprehensible pile of single letters and punctuation marks that would need to be completely re-written given the tiniest change in your requirements. –  Ed Morton Jan 16 '13 at 18:03

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted
+50

Just do 2 passes - the first (when NR==FNR) to find the title and the line number that you want it printed before and the second to print it and the other lines when the line numbers are appropriate:

$ cat tst.awk
NR==FNR {
   if (hdrEnd && !title && NF)  {title = $0; titleStart=FNR; titleEnd=FNR+1 }
   if (hdrStart && /^---$/)     {hdrEnd   = FNR }
   if (!hdrStart && /^---$/)    {hdrStart = FNR }
   next
}
FNR == hdrEnd { print "title:", title }
(FNR < titleStart) || (FNR > titleEnd)

$ awk -f tst.awk file file      
---
layout: post
tags: 
  - might 
  - be
  - variable 
  - number 
  - of 
  - these
category: ecology
title: my (h2 size) title
---




some text


possible other titles we don't want
-----------------------------------

more text more text

hdrStart is the line number where the header starts, etc. If you want to skip more lines around the title than just the text and subsequent line of underscores, just change how titleStart and titleEnd are populated to FNR-1 and FNR+2 or whatever. FNR (File Number of Records) is the current line number in just the currently open file while NR (Number of Records) is the number of lines read so far in total across all previously and currently opened files.

If you don't want to specify the file name twice on the command line you can duplicate it in awks BEGIN section:

$ cat tst.awk             
BEGIN{ ARGV[ARGC++] = ARGV[ARGC-1] }
NR==FNR {
   if (hdrEnd && !title && NF)  {title = $0; titleStart=FNR; titleEnd=FNR+1 }
   if (hdrStart && /^---$/)     {hdrEnd   = FNR }
   if (!hdrStart && /^---$/)    {hdrStart = FNR }
   next
}
FNR == hdrEnd { print "title:", title }
(FNR < titleStart) || (FNR > titleEnd)

then you only need to invoke the script as:

$ awk -f tst.awk file

EDIT: Actually - here's an alternative that doesn't do a 2-pass approach and is arguably simpler:

$ cat tst.awk
(state == 0) && /^---$/ { state=1; print; next }
(state == 1) && /^---$/ { state=2; next }
(state == 2) && /^./    { state=3; printf "title: %s\n---\n",$0; next }
(state == 3) && /^-+$/  { state=4; next }

state != 2 { print }

$ awk -f tst.awk file
---
layout: post
tags: 
  - might 
  - be
  - variable 
  - number 
  - of 
  - these
category: ecology
title: my (h2 size) title
---

some text


possible other titles we don't want
-----------------------------------

more text more text

If you're familiar with state machines it should be obvious what it's doing, if not let me know.

share|improve this answer
    
wow, that's quite elegant. Thanks for the very intuitive code with the state machines! –  cboettig Jan 17 '13 at 0:14

A quick and dirty perl code:

$/=undef;  # null line delimiter, so that the following reads the full file
my $all=<STDIN>;
my @parts=split(/^(----*)$/m,$all); # split in sections delimited by all-dashes linse
my @head=split("\n",$parts[2]);  # split the header in lines
my @tit=split("\n",$parts[4]);  # split the title section in lines
push @head,pop @tit;            # remove the last line from the title section and append to head
$parts[2]=join("\n",@head)."\n"; # rebuild the header
$parts[4]=join("\n",@tit);       # rebuild the title section
print join("",@parts);           # rebuild all and print to stdout

This might not be robust enough for you: it doesn't care if there are 3 or more dashes, it assumes UNIX newlines, does not check that the title is non-blank, etc. BUt it might be useful as a starting point, or if you need only to run this once. Another approach could be to read all lines in memory in a array, loop for the delimiter lines and move the title line.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for this, I think I can modify the regexp to work. stupid perl question though -- how is this intended to be run? I tried perl script.pl test.txt which simply didn't return. –  cboettig Jan 14 '13 at 5:06
1  
It is forced to read the input from <STDIN>. I would change that to just <> so that it reads from a file if a file name is supplied. However, it also fails to print the title in the actual header. –  tripleee Jan 14 '13 at 7:33

maybe this Perl code will help you to find a solution:

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use Modern::Perl;
use File::Slurp;

my @file_content = read_file('test.yml');
my ($start, $stop, $title);
foreach my $line (@file_content) {

    if ($line =~ m{ --- }xms) {
        if (!$start) {
            $start = 1;
        }
        else {
            $stop = 1;
            next;
        }
    }    

    if ($line && $stop && $line = m{\w}xms) {
        $title = $line;
        last;
    }


}

say "Title: $title";

Output with data from above: Title: my (h2 size) title

share|improve this answer

Good old python:

with open("i.yaml") as fp:
    lines = fp.readlines()

c = False
i = 0
target = -1

for line in lines:
    i += 1
    if c:
        if line.strip() != "":
            source = i - 1
            c = False

    if line.strip() == "---":
        if i > 1:
            c = True
            target = i - 1

lines[target:target] = ["title: " + lines[source]]
del lines[source + 1]
del lines[source + 1]

with open("o.yaml", "w") as fp:
    fp.writelines(lines)
share|improve this answer

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