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I was curious on how it would be possible to split mathematical equations with parenthesis meaningfully using java's string regex. It's hard to explain without an example, one is below.

A generic solution pattern would be appreciated, rather than one which just works for the example provided below.

String s = "(5 + 6) + (2 - 18)";
// I want to split this string via the regex pattern of "+",
// (but only the non-nested ones) 
// with the result being [(5 + 6), (2 - 18)]

s.split("\\+"); // Won't work, this will split via every plus.

What I'm mainly looking for is first level splitting, I want a regex check to see if a symbol like "+" or "-" is nested in any form, if it is, don't split it, if it isn't split it. Nesting can be in the form of () or [].

Thank you.

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Do you also expect splitting nested expressions like ((6 - 5) + 4)? –  TechSpellBound Jan 13 '13 at 4:46
    
No, all I need is first level splitting, I want a regex check to see if a symbol like "+" or "-" is nested in any form, if it is, don't split it, if it isn't split it. Nesting can be in the form of () or []. –  Lucas Ou Jan 13 '13 at 5:08
    
Check my answer.. let me add the logic for []. It wasn't your initial requirement.. –  TechSpellBound Jan 13 '13 at 5:10

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you don't expect splitting nested expressions like ((6 + 5)-4), I have a pretty simple function to split the expressions without using regular expressions :

public static String[] subExprs(String expr) {
    /* Actual logic to split the expression */
    int fromIndex = 0;
    int subExprStart = 0;
    ArrayList<String> subExprs = new ArrayList<String>();
    again:
    while ((subExprStart = expr.indexOf("(", fromIndex)) != -1) {
        fromIndex = subExprStart;
        int substringEnd=0;
        while((substringEnd = expr.indexOf(")", fromIndex)) != -1){
            subExprs.add(expr.substring(subExprStart, substringEnd+1));
            fromIndex = substringEnd + 1;
            continue again; 
        }
    }

    /* Logic only for printing */
    System.out.println("Original expression : " + expr);
    System.out.println();
    System.out.print("Sub expressions : [ ");
    for (String string : subExprs) {
        System.out.print(string + ", ");
    }
    System.out.print("]");
    String[] subExprsArray = {};
    return subExprs.toArray(subExprsArray);
}

Sample output :

Original expression : (a+b)+(5+6)+(57-6)

Sub expressions : [ (a+b), (5+6), (57-6), ]

EDIT

For the extra condition of also getting expressions enclosed in [], this code will handle expressions inside both () and [].

public static String[] subExprs(String expr) {

    /* Actual logic to split the expression */
    int fromIndex = 0;
    int subExprStartParanthesis = 0;
    int subExprStartSquareBrackets = 0;
    ArrayList<String> subExprs = new ArrayList<String>();
    again: while ((subExprStartParanthesis = expr.indexOf("(", fromIndex)) > -2
            && (subExprStartSquareBrackets = expr.indexOf("[", fromIndex)) > -2) {

        /* Check the type of current bracket */
        boolean isParanthesis = false;
        if (subExprStartParanthesis == -1
                && subExprStartSquareBrackets == -1)
            break;
        else if (subExprStartParanthesis == -1)
            isParanthesis = false;
        else if (subExprStartSquareBrackets == -1)
            isParanthesis = true;
        else if (subExprStartParanthesis < subExprStartSquareBrackets)
            isParanthesis = true;

        /* Extract the sub expression */
        fromIndex = isParanthesis ? subExprStartParanthesis
                : subExprStartSquareBrackets;
        int subExprEndParanthesis = 0;
        int subExprEndSquareBrackets = 0;
        if (isParanthesis) {
            while ((subExprEndParanthesis = expr.indexOf(")", fromIndex)) != -1) {
                subExprs.add(expr.substring(subExprStartParanthesis,
                        subExprEndParanthesis + 1));
                fromIndex = subExprEndParanthesis + 1;
                continue again;
            }
        } else {
            while ((subExprEndSquareBrackets = expr.indexOf("]", fromIndex)) != -1) {
                subExprs.add(expr.substring(subExprStartSquareBrackets,
                        subExprEndSquareBrackets + 1));
                fromIndex = subExprEndSquareBrackets + 1;
                continue again;
            }
        }
    }

    /* Logic only for printing */
    System.out.println("Original expression : " + expr);
    System.out.println();
    System.out.print("Sub expressions : [ ");
    for (String string : subExprs) {
        System.out.print(string + ", ");
    }
    System.out.print("]");
    String[] subExprsArray = {};
    return subExprs.toArray(subExprsArray);
}

Sample Output :

Original expression : (a+b)+[5+6]+(57-6)-[a-b]+[c-d]

Sub expressions : [ (a+b), [5+6], (57-6), [a-b], [c-d], ]

Do suggest improvements in the code. :)

share|improve this answer
    
It's curious that you marked this answer as correct when your question specifies the use of regular expressions. Not that it's actually possible. –  EJP Jan 13 '13 at 9:21
    
@EJP As per the different answers, no solutions in Regex were available. Also, the author wanted only one level of paranthesis. I had asked him about nested expressions like ((6 + 5) - 3). So, I gave this answer to decrease the overhead of a new library. Do you feel that's right? –  TechSpellBound Jan 14 '13 at 9:49

You can't know that you will never get more than one level of parentheses, and you can't analyze recursive syntax with a regular expression, by definition. You need to use or write a parser. Have aloo, around for the Dijkstra Shunting Yard Algorithm, or a recursive descent expression parser, or a library that will do either,

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Unfortunately, not with RegEx, you need a library like JEP

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