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I can't seem to figure out how to select the number of previously deleted records with SQL Server 2008. Is it something like this?

DELETE FROM [table] WHERE [id]=10
SELECT SCOPE_IDENTITY()
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1  
While @@RowCount will give you the number of rows, you can also use an OUTPUT clause to get any data from the rows, e.g. the id values. OUTPUT can be used with INSERT, UPDATE and DELETE and provides access to both before and after values in the case of UPDATE. A tool well worth having in your pocket. –  HABO Jan 13 '13 at 5:30

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Use SELECT @@ROWCOUNT immediately after the DELETE statement. You can read more about @@ROWCOUNT on MSDN:

@@ROWCOUNT

Returns the number of rows affected by the last statement.

Remarks

...

Data manipulation language (DML) statements set the @@ROWCOUNT value to the number of rows affected by the query and return that value to the client. The DML statements may not send any rows to the client.

Note that I say "immediately after" because other statements can change the value of @@ROWCOUNT, even if they don't affect rows, per se:

DECLARE CURSOR and FETCH set the @@ROWCOUNT value to 1.

...

Statements such as USE, SET <option>, DEALLOCATE CURSOR, CLOSE CURSOR, BEGIN TRANSACTION or COMMIT TRANSACTION reset the ROWCOUNT value to 0.

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Thanks. I knew I was missing something simple :) –  c00000fd Jan 13 '13 at 4:37

You can also SET NOCOUNT OFF.

Remarks

When SET NOCOUNT is ON, the count (indicating the number of rows affected by a Transact-SQL statement) is not returned. When SET NOCOUNT is OFF, the count is returned.

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When debugging a stored procedure, I generally use this code snippet below:

DELCARE @Msg varchar(30)
...
SELECT @Msg = CAST(@@ROWCOUNT AS VARCHAR(10)) + ' rows affected'
RAISERROR (@Msg, 0, 1) WITH NOWAIT

I use it before and after an operation, like for a delete. I'll put a number in the message to keep track of which snippet I'm on in the code. It's very helpful when you are dealing with a large stored procedure with lots of lines of code.

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