Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I wrote a Link class for passing data between two nodes in a network. I've implemented it with two deques (one for data going from node 0 to node 1, and the other for data going from node 1 to node 0). I'm trying to multithread the application, but I'm getting threadlocks. I'm trying to prevent reading from and writing to the same deque at the same time. In reading more about how I originally implemented this, I think I'm using the condition variables incorrectly (and maybe shouldn't be using the boolean variables?). Should I have two mutexes, one for each deque? Please help if you can. Thanks!

class Link {
public:
// other stuff...
void push_back(int sourceNodeID, Data newData);
void get(int destinationNodeID, std::vector<Data> &linkData);

private:
// other stuff...
std::vector<int> nodeIDs_;
// qVector_ has two deques, one for Data from node 0 to node 1 and 
// one for Data from node 1 to node 0
std::vector<std::deque<Data> > qVector_; 
void initialize(int nodeID0, int nodeID1);

boost::mutex mutex_;
std::vector<boost::shared_ptr<boost::condition_variable> > readingCV_;
std::vector<boost::shared_ptr<boost::condition_variable> > writingCV_;
std::vector<bool> writingData_;
std::vector<bool> readingData_;
};

The push_back function:

void Link::push_back(int sourceNodeID, Data newData)
{
int idx;
if (sourceNodeID == nodeIDs_[0]) idx = 1;
else 
{
    if (sourceNodeID == nodeIDs_[1]) idx = 0;
    else throw runtime_error("Link::push_back: Invalid node ID");
}

boost::unique_lock<boost::mutex> lock(mutex_);
// pause to avoid multithreading collisions
while (readingData_[idx]) readingCV_[idx]->wait(lock);

writingData_[idx] = true;
qVector_[idx].push_back(newData);
writingData_[idx] = false;
writingCV_[idx]->notify_all();
}

The get function:

void Link::get(int destinationNodeID,
std::vector<Data> &linkData)
{
int idx;
if (destinationNodeID == nodeIDs_[0]) idx = 0;
else 
{
    if (destinationNodeID == nodeIDs_[1]) idx = 1;
    else throw runtime_error("Link::get: Invalid node ID");
}

boost::unique_lock<boost::mutex> lock(mutex_);
// pause to avoid multithreading collisions
while (writingData_[idx]) writingCV_[idx]->wait(lock);
readingData_[idx] = true;

std::copy(qVector_[idx].begin(),qVector_[idx].end(),back_inserter(linkData));
qVector_[idx].erase(qVector_[idx].begin(),qVector_[idx].end());
readingData_[idx] = false;
readingCV_[idx]->notify_all();
return;
}

and here's initialize (in case it's helpful)

void Link::initialize(int nodeID0, int nodeID1)
{
readingData_ = std::vector<bool>(2,false);
writingData_ = std::vector<bool>(2,false);
for (int i = 0; i < 2; ++i)
{
    readingCV_.push_back(make_shared<boost::condition_variable>());
    writingCV_.push_back(make_shared<boost::condition_variable>());
}
nodeIDs_.reserve(2);
nodeIDs_.push_back(nodeID0);
nodeIDs_.push_back(nodeID1);
qVector_.reserve(2);
qVector_.push_back(std::deque<Data>());
qVector_.push_back(std::deque<Data>());
}
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I'm trying to multithread the application, but I'm getting threadlocks.

What is a "threadlock"? It's difficult to see what your code is trying to accomplish. Consider, first, your push_back() code, whose synchronized portion looks like this:

boost::unique_lock<boost::mutex> lock(mutex_);

while (readingData_[idx]) readingCV_[idx]->wait(lock);

writingData_[idx] = true;
qVector_[idx].push_back(newData);
writingData_[idx] = false;
writingCV_[idx]->notify_all();

Your writingData[idx] boolean starts off as false, and becomes true only momentarily while a thread has the mutex locked. By the time the mutex is released, it is false again. So for any other thread that has to wait to acquire the mutex, writingData[idx] will never be true.

But in your get() code, you have

boost::unique_lock<boost::mutex> lock(mutex_);
// pause to avoid multithreading collisions
while (writingData_[idx]) writingCV_[idx]->wait(lock);

By the time a thread gets the lock on the mutex, writingData[idx] is back to false and so the while loop (and wait on the CV) is never entered.

An exactly symmetric analysis applies to the readingData[idx] boolean, which also is always false outside the mutex lock.

So your condition variables are never waited on. You need to completely rethink your design.

Start with one mutex per queue (the deque is overkill for simply passing data), and for each queue associate a condition variable with the queue being non-empty. The get() method will thus wait until the queue is non-empty, which will be signalled in the push_back() method. Something like this (untested code):

template <typename Data>
class BasicQueue
{
public:
    void push( Data const& data )
    {
        boost::unique_lock  _lock( mutex_ );
        queue_.push_back( data );
        not_empty_.notify_all();
    }

    void get ( Data& data )
    {
        boost::unique_lock  _lock( mutex_ );
        while ( queue_.size() == 0 )
            not_empty_.wait( _lock ); // this releases the mutex
        // mutex is reacquired here, with queue_.size() > 0
        data = queue_.front();
        queue_.pop_front();         
    }

private:
    std::queue<Data>            queue_;
    boost::mutex                mutex_;
    boost::condition_variable   not_empty_;
};
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the response. I meant "deadlock" -- that's what I get for writing a question at midnight. Also, I certainly need to clean up this implementation, but I thought this was the way the boolean variables that a condition variable were tied to were supposed to work. I wanted to allow reading in get() to be performed any time that another thread isn't writing to the same deque. So, I only set writingData to true when a thread is actually writing data. Don't the boolean flags needed to be protected by a locked mutex so reading and writing don't happen at the same time? –  John Doe Jan 14 '13 at 1:56
    
You are setting it back to false within the scope of the same lock! By the time another thread examines the boleoan, which this new thread can do only after acquiring the mutex, which is after the first thread has released it, the boolean is false again. –  arayq2 Jan 14 '13 at 2:47
2  
You may be confused about what CVs are for. When a thread waits on a CV, it is (atomically) releasing the mutex so that some other thread can get the mutex, operate on the shared variables and (possibly) signal the condition that the first thread is waiting for. A CV is not for "informing" some other thread about what this thread might or might not be doing. Please look at the code I've added to my answer. Note how the reading thread has to wait for some data to appear on the queue, an operation that only a writing thread can perform (and then signal that fact). –  arayq2 Jan 14 '13 at 3:26
    
There is no deadlock in the code you've presented. There may be a lot of spinning (e.g. your get() function has no guarantee that there is anything in the deque.) –  arayq2 Jan 14 '13 at 5:13
    
Clearly I was confused about what CVs are for. I was thinking that whenever there was a lock, a CV was needed. Thanks for helping me sort through this. Back to the drawing board... –  John Doe Jan 15 '13 at 14:50

Yes. You need two mutexes. Your deadlocks are almost certainly a result of contention on the single mutex. If you break into your running program with a debugger you will see where the threads are hanging. Also I don't see why you would need the bools. (EDIT: It may be possible to come up with a design that uses a single mutex but it's simpler and safer to stick with one mutex per shared data structure)

A rule of thumb would be to have one mutex per shared data structure you are trying to protect. That mutex guards the data structure against concurrent access and provides thread safety. In your case one mutex per deque. E.g.:

class SafeQueue
{
private:
  std::deque<Data> q_;
  boost::mutex m_;
  boost::condition_variable v_;

public:
  void push_back(Data newData)
  {
    boost::lock_guard<boost::mutex> lock(m_);
    q_.push_back(newData);
    // notify etc.
  }
// ...
};

In terms of notification via condition variables see here:

Using condition variable in a producer-consumer situation

So there would also be one condition_variable per object which the producer would notify and the consumer would wait on. Now you can create two of these queues for communicating in both directions. Keep in mind that with only two threads you can still deadlock if both threads are blocked (waiting for data) and both queues are empty.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for your help, as well. I certainly need to simplify this a lot (and read more!). –  John Doe Jan 15 '13 at 14:52

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.