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I am trying to run ls|wc using execvp. So I create a pipe and then fork to create a child. I close the appropriate(read./write) end in parent/child and then map the other end to stdout/stdin. Then I run the ls in parent using execvp and wc in child. When I run the program it says

 wc:standard input:bad file descriptor.
 0 0 0
 wc: -:Bad file descriptor

Here is my code:

int main()
{
//int nbBytes = 0; //stream length
int pfd_1[2]; //file descriptor 
//char buffer[MAX_FILE_LENGTH]; 
char* arg[MAX_FILE_LENGTH];
pid_t processPid;

//Create a pipe

if(pipe(pfd_1) == -1)
{
    printf("Error in creating pipe");
    return 0;
}

//Create a child
processPid = fork();

if(processPid == -1)
{
    printf("Erro in fork");
    exit(1);
}   
else if(processPid == 0) //Child
{               
    //redirect read end file descriptor to standard input
    dup2(pfd_1[0],0);
    //Close the write end
    if(close(pfd_1[1] == -1))
    {
        printf("Error in closing the write end file descriptor");
        exit(1);
    }
    arg[0] = "wc";
    //arg[1] = "-l";
    arg[1] = '\0';

    if(execvp(arg[0],arg) == -1)
    {
        printf("Error in executing ls");
    }       

}
else //Parent
{               
    //redirect standard output to the file descriptor
    dup2(pfd_1[1],1);
    //Close the read end
    if(close(pfd_1[0] == -1))
    {
        printf("Error in closing the read end from parent");
        exit(1);
    }
    //Command 
    arg[0] = "ls";
    arg[1] = "/proc/1/status";
    arg[2] = '\0';

    if(execvp(arg[0],arg) == -1)
    {
        printf("Error in executing ls");
    }       
}

}

Any idea what might be wrong? Why would it consider standard input as bad file descriptor? My understanding was since the stdin and read end file descriptor are aliases so the wc -l would read whatever the output is from the parent process. Do I need to do scanf to read from the stdin?

share|improve this question
    
Error messages belong on stderr. Do not use printf to display them. Instead, use perror. This will also display the system error messages telling you the reason for the error. Also, you are leaving file descriptors open. Try: dup2( pfd_1[0], 0 ); close( pfd_1[0]); close( pfd_1[1]); And check that dup2 succeeds. –  William Pursell Jan 13 '13 at 13:31

2 Answers 2

The problem is in this line:

if(close(pfd_1[1] == -1))

You are closing the result of pfd_1[1] == -1, which is by necessity equal to 0 (as they will never be equal). The correct line would probably be:

if (close(pfd_1[1]) == -1)

Note that you do this again later in attempting to close the read end in the parent process.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for pointing it out! I changed it but still having the same problem. –  Arunav Dev Jan 13 '13 at 5:24
    
I just tested the code (assuming a large-enough value for MAX_FILE_LENGTH and the proper #includes) after changing those two lines, and it works here on my machine. –  Jonathan Callen Jan 13 '13 at 5:41

If you're going to fork children, you have to call wait() in the parent process in order to avoid "zombie" child processes. So you don't want to overlay the parent process that did the original process forking with another executable via exec.

One quick way to setup a series of pipes in the way you want would be to fork a child for each executable you want to run, and read that data back into a buffer in the parent. Then feed that data from the first child into a new child process that the parent forks off. So each child is fed data from the parent, processes the data, and writes the data back to the parent process, which stores the transformed data in a buffer. That buffer is then fed to the next child, etc., etc. The final results of the data in the buffer are the final output of the pipe.

Here's a little pseudo-code:

//allocate buffer
unsigned char buffer[SIZE];

for (each executable to run in pipeline)
{
    pipes[2];
    pipe(pipes);

    pid_t pid = fork();

    if (pid == 0)
    {
        //setup the pipe in the child process
        //call exec
    }
    else
    {
        //setup the pipe in the parent process

        if (child executable is not the first in the pipeline)
        {
            //write contents of buffer to child process
        }

        //read from the pipe until the child exits
        //store the results in buffer

        //call wait, and maybe also check the return value to make sure the 
        //child returned successfully
        wait(NULL);

        //clean up the pipe
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
As both processes exit quickly, you can get away with not cleaning up zombies as they get re-parented to PID 1, which does do such cleanup. –  Jonathan Callen Jan 13 '13 at 5:40
    
Well, all zombies are parented to PID 1, that's why they're "zombie" processes ... in the end relying on PID 1 to-do your dirty work is simply not a good habit to form. –  Jason Jan 13 '13 at 5:59
    
Thanks for the tips. But doing any of these did not solve my problem. –  Arunav Dev Jan 13 '13 at 7:09
    
@Jason zombies aren't re-parented to PID 1 until after their parent goes away -- and they are still zombies until their parent (whoever it may be) cleans them up; also, buffering in the parent is almost always the wrong thing to do -- just directly connect the children together with pipes. –  Jonathan Callen Jan 13 '13 at 9:04
    
@JonathanCallen Why is that "almost always" the wrong thing to-do? I've found it a very elegant way to manage long pipes as well as create an environment that can be easily debugged without having a bunch of processes being spun off. You can just debug the parent process and see what's going on. Is there a specific reason I'm not seeing to avoid this scenario? If it's overflowing the buffer, that can always be managed through using dynamic memory allocation rather than a static buffer like I did in the code sample. –  Jason Jan 13 '13 at 14:41

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