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I've been trying to make a class to represent a deck of cards. However, I wanted to create it in a way which it could be any kind of cards, it doesn't need to know which kind it just has be able to store them, shuffle and draw them one at a time be them uno cards, regular playing cards, or trading cards. For this, I've been trying something I've heard of but have not used -- Generics.

However, I've had no luck at all trying to get it to work. It won't instantiate, populate cards, or return the correct type when drawing the card. I've tried mixing and matching and I just simply can't get it to work.

Old Code that was buggy was truncated to save space, look at previous edits to see. Summary: I used Cardable instead of T and lacked to express generics in general.

So how would this work, I'm completely new to generics. I've been looking around everywhere and I keep hearing about Type Erasure and that the class literal should be a parameter and yadda yadda... But then how does ArrayList do it? Why is it that you can just type ArrayList<String>() and it will just work without needing something ridiculous like ArrayList<String>(String.GetClass())?

Thanks for your time.

Edit: Cardable is a class in which any card that can be put into the deck will extend.

Edit2: Perception's suggestion has thus fixed my code, but I am not sure how I could call to populate the deck. Right now I have it to accept an array, but it would be nice to have it internal, and I'm not entirely sure I grasp the entire factory method.

public class Deck<T extends Cardable>
{
    private ArrayList<T> cardsInDeck;

    public Deck()
    {
        cardsInDeck = new ArrayList<T>();
    }

    public void populate( T[] newCards )
    {
        cardsInDeck.clear();
        for( T card : newCards )
        {
            cardsInDeck.add( card );
        }
        shuffle();
    }

    public T drawCard()
    {
        T card = null;
        try
        {
            card = cardsInDeck.get( 0 );
        }
        catch( IndexOutOfBoundsException e )
        {
            System.out.println( "Ran out of Cards" );
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
        cardsInDeck.remove( 0 );
        return card;
    }

    public void shuffle()
    {
        ArrayList<T> newDeck = new ArrayList<T>();
        Random rand = new Random();
        while( !cardsInDeck.isEmpty() )
        {
            int index = rand.nextInt( cardsInDeck.size() );
            newDeck.add( cardsInDeck.get( index ) );
            cardsInDeck.remove( index );
        }
        cardsInDeck = newDeck;
    }

    public int getSize()
    {
        return cardsInDeck.size();
    }
}
share|improve this question
1  
You specified your generic type as T, but you are using Cardable throughout most of your class. You need to use T instead. –  Perception Jan 13 '13 at 6:01
    
"Cardable"? I really don't understand your example. Could you please clarify the part you have questions about; the part that doesn't work? –  paulsm4 Jan 13 '13 at 6:02
    
The field t is not initialized, you will get an NPE. –  Bruno Reis Jan 13 '13 at 6:07
    
You can't get the type's class, if that's one of your concerns. You have to pass the class as a parameter if you want to call a static method as it seems you do. ArrayList never tries to do so (call a static method of the generic type's class), so it doesn't needs the class. I think you need to do some more research so you get to understand the concept of generics a little better, maybe follow some basic example? –  asermax Jan 13 '13 at 6:28
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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The thing is: the implementation of ArrayList<E> does not depend on the actual type E. That's why you don't need to pass the type in the constructor (as you say, new ArrayList<String>(String.class)).

If you write a generic class that, for some reason, must know exactly what the generic type represents at runtime, then you need to pass the type in the constructor, because, as you said, type erasure will not allow you to get the class from T. You'd need new MyClassThatNeedToKnowItsActualTypeParameter<String>(String.class).

For instance, suppose a class that accesses a database and retrieves an instance of a given class. The instances of a class are stored in a table named after the class. For example:

class MyRepository<T> {
  T load(int id) { ... }
}

The method load needs to know exactly what T is at runtime, because it needs to be able to construct a query that will use the name of the actual class which T represents. However, in Java, you cannot obtain this information from T , since T will disappear due to type erasure. Furthermore, the load method needs a way to create an instance of the correct type and write data from the database to it. To create an instance of a class, you'd use reflection, doing clazz.newInstance() for example. Here, again, you need to know exactly what class you are dealing with. You'd end up with something like this:

class MyRepository<T> 
  private final Class<T> clazz;
  MyRepository(Class<T> clazz) { this.clazz = clazz; }
  T load(int id) {
    final String tableName = clazz.getSimpleName() + "Table";
    /* connect, retrieve data, disconnect */
    final T t = clazz.newInstance(); // must be inside try/catch
    /* fill instance t with data from database somehow (using reflection probably, which, again, needs to know what clazz is */
    return t;
  }
}

...
final MyRepository<User> userRepository = new MyRepository<User>(User.class);
final User user = userRepository.load(123);
...
share|improve this answer
    
Good point. That does make sense now. As Perception has said, I neglected to use the specified T in the class. I was thrown off because everytime I put it in, it would create an error (unknown to me it was because I had not put the T everywhere yet) which would lead me to believe I was doing it wrong. –  Jonathan Pearl Jan 13 '13 at 6:24
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You could use generics for this, but the deck will not be able to populate itself—it doesn't know what class of object to create! From your description, what you want is basically an ArrayList<T> where T can be anything; it doesn't even have to be cards. What you need, though, is a way to populate the deck. For that, a factory object can be used:

public interface CardGenerator<T> {
    T[] generateAllCards();
}

public class Deck<T> {
    private ArrayList<T> cardsInDeck;

    public Deck(CardGenerator<T> generator) {
        cardsInDeck = new ArrayList<T>();
        cardsInDeck.addAll(generator.generateAllCards());
    }
    . . .
}

If you like, you can restrict the type of T to extend Cardable, but in terms of the logic of Deck (as far as you have described it), that isn't necessary.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm not entirely sure if I'm grasping what this is doing, the different card types will have different methods to create cards. –  Jonathan Pearl Jan 13 '13 at 6:31
    
So wait, what about static methods? I'm not entirely sure I can make it work statically. Unless, I need to have a generator for every card type? –  Jonathan Pearl Jan 13 '13 at 6:39
    
@JonathanPearl - Yes, you would need a generator for each card type. Some object needs to know what kind of objects to generate and how to initialize them. If you want your Deck to be independent of specific card types, you need a common interface for generating the cards. I don't see static methods entering into this. –  Ted Hopp Jan 13 '13 at 7:30
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Looking at the code i dont think you really need a generic class as you are hardly using T. If you simply change your populate method to something like this your job should be done:

public void populate(Cardable t)
    {
        cardsInDeck.clear();
        Cardable[] cardsMade;

        cardsMade = t.makeAllCards();

        for( Cardable card : cardsMade )
        {
            cardsInDeck.add( card );
        }


        shuffle();
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Not using T was my mistake. I do indeed would like to have generics because I want the compiler to recognize that an uno card and a playing card should not be in the same deck. –  Jonathan Pearl Jan 13 '13 at 6:25
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Don't use generics.

You would only use genetics if you wanted to handle different types of cards, eg

  • 52 card deck
  • tarot cards
  • 63 card 5-handed 500 deck
  • etc

This problem doesn't supply to your situation.

share|improve this answer
    
But that's exactly what I want to do. In the original question, I gave the example of playing cards, uno cards, and trading cards. –  Jonathan Pearl Jan 13 '13 at 8:24
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