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On ruby-doc, the documentation entries for File::exist? and File::exists? are duplicated with different semantics: one entry says returns true if file_name is a directory; the other says returns true if file_name is a file.

I don't think either entry is correct. Both methods seem to be implemented in file.c using rb_file_exist_p, which, seems to try to call fstat() if the value passed is an IO, or stat() if it's a string. Both fstat() and stat() return 0 on success and -1 on error, and this is passed back to rb_file_exist_p, and turned into a boolean result. It seems to me that

  1. there are two methods for making code read more easily; there are no semantic differences
  2. neither really relates to a file existing, but to whether a file-like item exists, e.g. a file, a dir, a socket, a fifo etc.
  3. perhaps the document could say that the methods tell the caller whether or not a thing that has file-like semantics is there, but more specific tests will tell what it actually is: e.g. directory?, file?, socket? etc.

Is my understanding of the (lack of) difference in the methods correct, and is it worth suggesting a change to the document ?

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This should be asked on Ruby-talk, where it can make a difference. Or, you could check out the source code on git, make the change and make a pull request. Personally, I don't think it's a big issue since -e ("exists") is a flag at the OS level on *nix systems that handles both files and directories equally. That there are separate entries for files and directories was a minor point to me. In general this question isn't a good fit for SO I think, and seems to fall under the "not constructive" category. –  the Tin Man Jan 13 '13 at 6:22
2  
@theTinMan: I'd have to disagree, I think that clarification of confused and broken documentation is a practical programming problem that would, at least, fall under practical, answerable problems that are unique to the programming profession. –  mu is too short Jan 13 '13 at 6:31

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

If we look at the C source, we see this:

rb_cFile = rb_define_class("File", rb_cIO);
/* ... */
define_filetest_function("exist?", rb_file_exist_p, 1);
define_filetest_function("exists?", rb_file_exist_p, 1);

So File.exist? and File.exists? are exactly the same thing and the corresponding documentation is:

Return <code>true</code> if the named file exists.

The rb_file_exist_p C function is just a very thin wrapper around rb_stat, that's a wrapper for the STAT macro, and STAT is just a portability wrapper for the stat system call. So, the documentation above is correct: File#exist? returns true if the file exists.

If we check file.c for the documentation snippet that talks about directories, we find this:

/*
 * Document-method: exist?
 *
 * call-seq:
 *   Dir.exist?(file_name)   ->  true or false
 *   Dir.exists?(file_name)   ->  true or false
 *
 * Returns <code>true</code> if the named file is a directory,
 * <code>false</code> otherwise.
 *
 */

So it looks like the documentation generator is getting confused because Dir.exist? and File.exist? are documented in file.c even though Dir is defined in dir.c.

The underlying problem seems to be that the source code arrangement doesn't match what the documentation generator expects and the result is confused and incorrect documentation. I'm not sure how this should be fixed though.

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OK, I hadn't considered the generators - I'll see how one goes about submitting patches to that/those - cheers –  Leif Jan 13 '13 at 6:40
    
I think the obvious fix is either 1) tell the RDoc developers that they are standing on an invalid premise or 2) suggest the Ruby developers to move the Dir.exist? and Dir.exists? documentation to dir.c. –  sawa Jan 13 '13 at 9:08
    
I think I'll try the second one - need to check the mailing list to see if its been suggested before - the doc should be in the file the functionality is defined in, but there may be a perfectly good, but not obvious, reason its not there –  Leif Jan 13 '13 at 9:37

git pull made it go away - this was fixed here - not sure why generated doco on ruby-doc and apidock still wrong

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