Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I am designing a producer/consumer based application and I am stucked at representing Task produced by producer in class representation.

The actual problem goes like: A producer can produce a StandaloneTask which can be directly consumable by a consumer or it can produce a CompressTask which has to be goes through a TaskDecompressor first which extract it first into a number of StandaloneTask which can them be consumed by consumers.

Since there is a lot of commonality between the StandaloneTask and the CompressTask, so I have created a base class called TaskBase which contains all this common information.

class abstract TaskBase 
{

}

class StandloneTaskType1: TaskBase
{

}

class StandloneTaskType2: TaskBase
{

}

.
.
.

class StandloneTaskTypeN: TaskBase
{

}

How decompressing of a task works? A task can have one or more parameters which needs to be filled at run time. A compress task consists of a task with parameters and other info about how to get values that need to be filled in those parameters. After getting values, a TaskDecompressor is suppose to fill all these values into the parametrized task to generate one or more standalone task.

I have created a CompressTask class as follow.

class CompressTask: TaskBase
{
    TaskBase task;

    //runtime parameters
}

Now, its looks very weird to me that the CompressTask is derived from TaskBase and it also contains an instance of TaskBase. Is it correct to have such class? Or are there any better class representation of the given case.

share|improve this question
1  
Sounds like the Decorator Pattern to me. – Steven Jan 13 '13 at 6:33
    
it is fine. Google "Composite pattern" which is a well known design pattern, and it is an example of a case where the derived class has a collection of its base type. – Eren Ersönmez Jan 13 '13 at 6:36
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Overall this structure is not uncommon, you are somewhat starting to go down the road of the Composite pattern. Your CompressTask is somewhat acting like the Composite and your StandaloneTask is like the Leaf.

I'd recommend reading up on that design pattern and potentially think about making it easier for a consumer to consume any subclass of TaskBase regardless of it being a CompressTask or StandaloneTask. That will strengthen your design and simplify consumption.

share|improve this answer
    
Actually, my application is a cloud application where I have multiple instance of same consumers running on different machines. And that's why I wanted to expand the task first so that sub tasks gets equally distributed to all consumer. What do you suggest in this case? Still you would like to have a consumer which consumes the whole CompressTask. – Ravi Gupta Jan 14 '13 at 18:45
    
That's a whole discussion in itself. Distributed computing can be a complicated system and will certainly affect your design. What you're describing sounds like something Hadoop or something similar could help you with. Hadoop is really Java focused, but they have a streaming API that C# may be able to hook into. – Marc Baumbach Jan 14 '13 at 18:51
    
Also, your CompressTask (or any composite task) when run by a consumer, could simply ask your cloud application to distribute its contained tasks. You'll lose one consumer node in the system for each composite task run if your consumers can only handle one task at a time, so you'll need to plan for that. – Marc Baumbach Jan 14 '13 at 18:53

Imagine...

class Student: Person
{
    Person father;
    Person mother;
    Date dateOfEnrollment;
}

This makes perfect sense does it not? In principle there is nothing wrong with your CompressTask class.

share|improve this answer

One important OO design rule: favor composition over implementation inheritance. Just because StandaloneTask and CompressTask have many commonalities doesn't make it a good choice to let them share the same base class. If two classes share some interfaces, it's advisable to factor the interfaces out by use of interface inheritance. If two classes share some implementations, you'd better factor out the implementation into some class, and embed it into the said two classes(i.e. composition).

Back to your case, CompressTask is derived from TaskBase and it also contains an instance of TaskBase. That means you are using implementation inheritance and composition at the same time, which doesn't smell very well. The following skeleton is just for your reference:

interface Task
{
    // some common Task interface here...
}

class TaskImpl
// Or: class TaskImpl : Task // depends on your needs
{    
    // some common Task-related implementation here...
}

class CompressTask: Task // interface inheritance, NOT implementation inheritance
{
    TaskImpl taskImpl; // contains *reusable* task-related implementation
    Task task;  // contains the target task(s) to be compressed
    // other code...
}

class StandloneTaskType1: Task
{
    TaskImpl taskImpl;
    // other code...
}

.
.
.

class StandloneTaskTypeN: Task
{
    TaskImpl taskImpl;
    // other code...
}
share|improve this answer

Better still... Imagine...

class Foo // implicitly extends Object
{
    String name; // also a direct subclass of Object (at least in Java anyway)
    Integer age; // extends Number, which extends Object (at least in Javaland)
    Object theRootOfAllEvil; // a raw instance of the superclass
    int i; // the only member that is not an Object
}

Please pardon my Javanese but there's nothing wrong with any of this where I come from ;)

It all depends on the fine detail of your classes.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.