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This issue will surface for many who depend on Ruby's JSON serialization outside of a Rails projects. When they try to use their code in a Rails project, it will not work as expected.

The following code run from Ruby (no Rails), prints A. When run from rails console, it prints Hash.

That means my json serialization works in my command line lib/app, but not when it's imported into a Rails project.

What is the reason/workaround for this?

require 'json'

class A
  def to_json(*a)
    {:json_class => self.class.name}.to_json(*a)
  end
  def self.json_create(o)
    A.new
  end
end

class B
  attr_accessor :value
  def initialize(value)
    @value = value
  end

  def to_json(*a)
    {:json_class => self.class.name, :value => value}.to_json(*a)
  end
  def self.json_create(o)
    B.new(o['value'])
  end
end
b = JSON.parse(B.new(A.new).to_json)
puts b.value.class

Ruby is 1.9.3, Rails is 3.2.10

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Which version of Ruby? Ruby 1.9.2 (No Rails) prints A –  Steve Wilhelm Jan 13 '13 at 7:43
    
Sorry. Should have been prints A. Fixed. Thanks. –  z5h Jan 13 '13 at 7:45
    
To all who voted to close, this will be a problem for anyone who relies on JSON serialization working similarly in plain Ruby, and Rails. Other's have blogged about it. Please offer some constructive feedback or ask some questions before you vote to close. –  z5h Jan 19 '13 at 17:44
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3 Answers

The problem is that Rails uses ActiveSupport::JSON.

For serializing, it uses as_json, not to_json. So the line

 {:json_class => self.class.name, :value => value}.to_json(*a)

does not include a JSON version of value in the hash because Class A does not have a as_json method. To get your code to work the same in both Ruby and Rails, you need to explicitly call your A::to_json and A::json_create methods, like this:

  def to_json(*a)
    {:json_class => self.class.name, :value => JSON.dump(value)}.to_json(*a)
  end
  def self.json_create(o)
    B.new(A.json_create(o['value']))
  end

Then call, b = JSON.parse(JSON.dump(B.new(A.new)))

This wlll fix the example, but I think you may want to read this explanation of to_json vs as_json and revise your code appropriately.

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So if I go 3 levels deep my serialized string will be "{\"json_class\":\"C\",\"value\":\"{\\\"json_class\\\":\\\"B\\\",\\\"value\\\":\\\"{\\\\\\\"json_cl‌​ass\\\\\\\":\\\\\\\"A\\\\\\\"}\\\"}\"}"? Gross. You get a +1, thanks, but I'm not convinced it's the prettiest solution. –  z5h Jan 13 '13 at 8:47
1  
You're right, could be cleaner. Edited answer to use JSON.dump recursively instead of to_json. –  Steve Wilhelm Jan 13 '13 at 9:40
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up vote 1 down vote accepted

According to others, the answer is yes. http://www.rubyhood.com/2011/06/rails-spoiled-standard-json-library.html

In short, make as_json do what to_json does. That got me what I wanted/expected (and what I've been getting from pure Ruby - Rails).

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For those still wandering why the strange behavior is occurring in rails the explanation can be found in: https://github.com/flori/json/compare/v1.6.7...v1.6.8 and https://github.com/intridea/multi_json/compare/v1.5.0...v1.5.1

Since in these version upgrades JSON.parse works different. JSON.load might still be helpful. The fastest fix would be:

gem 'json', '1.6.7'
gem 'multi_json', '1.5.0'

but leave some security issues open. Explicitly supplying create_additions: true to JSON parse when needed is recommended.

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