Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This is kind of pseudo code but it should make clear what I want to know. I see all 3 variants in different code.

My question is which is the correct way of doing this and why? (Also see comments in code snippets)

test.h First way:

class Test {
    public:
        Test() 
            :_buffer(NULL)
         {
            _buffer = new char[1024];
        }

        ~Test() {
           delete _buffer;
        }

        int Function() {
           //use some function like inet_ntop doesn't work _buffer is not filled
           inet_ntop(p->ai_family, addr, _buffer,  sizeof(_buffer)-1);
           //here sizeof(_buffer) returns 4, WHY ?
           cout << sizeof(_buffer) << endl;
        }

    private:
        char *_buffer;
};

test.h Second way:

class Test {
    public:
        Test() {
            //_buffer is never initialized WHY ?
        }
        ~Test() {
           //_buffer is never deleted WHY ?
        }
        int Function() {
           //use some function like inet_ntop works correctly here _buffer is filled 
           inet_ntop(p->ai_family, addr, _buffer,  sizeof(_buffer)-1);
           //here sizeof(_buffer) returns 1024, WHY ?
           cout << sizeof(_buffer) << endl;
        }
     private:
         char _buffer[1024];
};

test.h Third way:

class Test {
    public:
        Test() {
        }
        ~Test() {
        }
        int Function() {
           char buffer[1024];
           //use some function like inet_ntop works correctly here _buffer is filled
           inet_ntop(p->ai_family, addr, _buffer,  sizeof(_buffer)-1);
           //here sizeof(_buffer) returns 1024
           cout << sizeof(_buffer) << endl;
        }
     private:
};
share|improve this question
3  
std::string buffer; –  chris Jan 13 '13 at 7:53
    
//here sizeof(_buffer) returns 1024, WHY ? - because sizeof(char) is 1 and you have 1024 of them. –  chris Jan 13 '13 at 7:55
    
You're asking a ton of questions here. The one in your title is what most people are answering, but the other ones in your code should be answered by a google search. –  Cornstalks Jan 13 '13 at 8:09
1  
One point you should take is that you must allocate the correct amount of space for the job. In example 3, you should be using char buffer[INET6_ADDRSTRLEN]; –  Troy Jan 13 '13 at 8:19
add comment

3 Answers

C++ What is the right way of declaring a char array in a class?

Neither.
In C++ the correct way is to use:

std::string buffer;

This is precisely the reason C++ provides std::string. It gives you freedom from:

  • explicitly managing memory as in #1 &
  • overwriting the bounds of statically allocated array as in #2.

Note that the 3 examples you show are not equivalent.
#1 & #2 bind the lifetime of the character buffer to your object instance,
While #3 does not do the same.

Note that if you need a local buffer(who's size is fixed) just to pass to an c-style api, then that usage doesn't make good use of the goodies offered by std::string and probably a statically allocated character array is much more suitable.

If your requirement is as in #1 and #2 then the better option is ofcourse std::string.

share|improve this answer
    
And if using C++03, you can't pass it directly into a function taking a char *. Just something to be wary of. You can't let the function overwrite the null terminator in C++11 either. –  chris Jan 13 '13 at 7:58
    
i am all for using std::string buffer as you say but inet_ntop takes char * and not a string class to fill its dst –  cutiepie666 Jan 13 '13 at 8:03
1  
@user1973678 that's what string.c_str() is for. –  Mahmoud Al-Qudsi Jan 13 '13 at 8:04
    
@user1973678, Are you using C++11? If so, pass &buffer[0] for the buffer and buffer.size() for the length. Be sure not to do this in C++03, though. –  chris Jan 13 '13 at 8:04
2  
@Troy: If you consider example 3 the context of the Q changes considerably. The original Q was, What is the best way to use character array in class. The answer is, best way is to use std::string. Example 3 just shows that user doesn't need a member, at all.S/He needs is a local character buffer to be passed to a C-api. And it will not be of use long enough to require the goodies offered by std::string. In that case a mere character buffer will serve better.The important thing to note here is the context changes drastically depending on usage. –  Alok Save Jan 13 '13 at 8:12
show 8 more comments

First variant: character array is allocated from the heap. IIRC, the delete in the destructor should be delete [] _buffer.

Second variant: character array is part of the class, and lives and dies with the class. Could be allocated from the heap or stack, depending on how the class is instantiated.

Third variant: character array is allocated on the stack, and is released when the enclosing scope — in this case, Function() — ends.

Having said that, unless you really do need an array of characters for a justifiable reason, using std::string is far better.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, it should be delete[]. It also introduces the rule of three/five. –  chris Jan 13 '13 at 7:59
add comment

I don't believe there is a "one true way" for what you are trying to do. Each of the methods involve a trade off. Specifically:

Method 1) You allocate memory on the heap. You incur a (slight) performance penalty. However, the size of your class in memory is reduced. If you allocate your class on the stack, you waste less stack space this way. As others have mentioned, you need to use the delete [] statement.

Regarding your comment, sizeof(buffer) returns 4 because buffer is a char pointer. Your platform defines pointers to be 4 bytes big. It doesn't report the size of the allocated array, as sizeof works on the type described to it. inet_ntop doesn't fill your buffer as you tell it your buffer is only 4 bytes big. inet_ntop simply fails as that buffer is much to small.

Method 2) This trades method 1's extra heap allocation for increased class size.

Regarding comments, the buffer is not initialized or deleted because C++ handles that. Since you instructed the compiler to provide you with a char array of size 1024 bytes, it provides you with one. You are not required to initialize/cleanup for the compiler. Also, sizeof returns 1024 as the type is a char array of 1024 bytes, thus the compiler know this and gives the array size. It doesn't return the size of a pointer here because you didn't ask for a pointer.

Method 3) This method instead allocates the buffer every time the function is called, and puts it on the stack. Depending upon what you intend to do with the data, this might be the best solution, or not applicable at all. If you don't need the buffer after the function ends, then it's a good choice.

share|improve this answer
    
thank you this was very useful, variant 3 seems best for my use –  cutiepie666 Jan 13 '13 at 8:31
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.