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In Linux, I have many files and I need to copy paste the mth word of the nth line of all the files onto a plain .txt file along with the file names. So my final text file looks somewhat like this...

<FileName1> <mth word of nth line of FileName1>
<FileName2> <mth word of nth line of FileName2>
.
.
<FileNameN> <mth word of nth line of FileNameN>

Can someone please let me know the Linux command for this. Thanking you!!

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A better fit for http://unix.stackexchange.com/ –  djthoms Jan 13 '13 at 8:42
    
Try awk and then tell us how you came: gnu.org/software/gawk/manual/gawk.html –  hakre Jan 13 '13 at 12:35
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closed as too localized by Emil Vikström, Harsha M V, hakre, Frank, mpapis Jan 13 '13 at 13:11

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2 Answers

#!/bin/bash

usage ()
{
  echo "usage: $0 DIR LINENO WORDNO"
  exit
}

clean ()
{
  rm -f a.txt
}

[ $1 ] || usage
clean
dir=$1
lineno=$2
wordno=$3

while read -u3 file
do
  read -a words < <(tail -n+$lineno $file)
  echo $file ${words[wordno-1]} >> a.txt
done 3< <(find $dir -type f)
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How about using awk?

#!/bin/bash

# Usage: <line> <word> <files...>

awk "NR==$1 { print FILENAME \" \" \$$2 }" "${@:3}"
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