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let's say I have 5 tables, as follows:

CREATE TABLE T1 (
FIRST_NAME VARCHAR2(100),
LAST_NAME VARCHAR2(100),
CITY NUMERIC,
SALARY NUMERIC);

CREATE TABLE T2 (
CITY NUMERIC,
DISTRICT  NUMERIC);

CREATE TABLE T3 (
DISTRICT NUMERIC,
DOMAIN NUMERIC);

CREATE TABLE T4 (
DOMAIN NUMERIC,
DETAILS_BOOK NUMERIC);

CREATE TABLE T5 (
DETAILS_BOOK NUMERIC,
FIRST_NAME VARCHAR2(100),
LAST_NAME VARCHAR2(100),
EMAIL VARCHAR2(100));

INSERT INTO T1 VALUES ('john', 'doe',1001,1000); 
INSERT INTO T1 VALUES ('jack', 'jill',1001,2000);
INSERT INTO T1 VALUES ('jeff', 'bush',1001,1500);

INSERT INTO T2 VALUES (1001,1);

INSERT INTO T3 VALUES (1,543);

INSERT INTO T4 VALUES (543,22);

INSERT INTO T5 VALUES (22,'john', 'doe','john@22.com');
INSERT INTO T5 VALUES (44,'john', 'doe','john@44.com');
INSERT INTO T5 VALUES (22,'jeff', 'bush','jeff@22.com');
INSERT INTO T5 VALUES (44,'jeff', 'bush','jeff@44.com');

now, I want all records from t1, with their salaries and emails, corresponding to tables t2, t3, and t4, such that the reuslt should be:

FIRST_NAME | LAST_NAME | SALARY | EMAIL
--------------------------------------------------
john       | doe       |  1000  | john@22.com
jeff       | bush      |  1500  | jeff@22.com
jack       | jill      |  2000  | (NULL)

what I got so far is:

SELECT T1.FIRST_NAME, T1.LAST_NAME,T1.SALARY,T5.EMAIL
FROM T1,T2,T3,T4,T5
WHERE   T1.FIRST_NAME = T5.FIRST_NAME (+)
and     T1.LAST_NAME = T5.LAST_NAME(+)
AND     T1.CITY = T2.CITY
AND     T2.DISTRICT = T3.DISTRICT
AND     T3.DOMAIN = T4.DOMAIN
AND     T4.DETAILS_BOOK = T5.DETAILS_BOOK

which returns only the first two rows.

share|improve this question
1  
Please go with Mahmoud Gamal's solution. But if you really, really want to use to old syntax, you would of course not to add many more (+). In your case, you need to have one on each line in the WHERE clause. –  Codo Jan 13 '13 at 9:36
    
@Codo Is this really possible using the old syntax? I am getting an error: a table may be outer joined to at most one other table, when tried to do so. –  Mahmoud Gamal Jan 13 '13 at 9:47
2  
Yes, you're right. I just realized that table T5 is joined to both T1 and T4, i.e. you have multi-column outer-join. That's not possible using the old syntax. You have to use the newer ANSI syntax to get your query to work. –  Codo Jan 13 '13 at 10:40

1 Answer 1

Try this instead:

SELECT 
  T1.FIRST_NAME, 
  T1.LAST_NAME,
  T1.SALARY,
  T5.EMAIL
FROM T1
LEFT JOIN T2  ON T1.CITY         = T2.CITY
LEFT JOIN T3  ON T2.DISTRICT     = T3.DISTRICT
LEFT JOIN T4  ON T3.DOMAIN       = T4.DOMAIN
LEFT JOIN T5  ON T4.DETAILS_BOOK = T5.DETAILS_BOOK
             AND T1.FIRST_NAME   = T5.FIRST_NAME
             AND T1.LAST_NAME    = T5.LAST_NAME;

SQL Fiddle Demo

This will give you:

| FIRST_NAME | LAST_NAME | SALARY |       EMAIL |
-------------------------------------------------
|       john |       doe |   1000 | john@22.com |
|       jeff |      bush |   1500 | jeff@22.com |
|       jack |      jill |   2000 |      (null) |

The problem is that the INNER JOIN after the OUTER JOIN makes your joins works like an INNER , because, the inner joins eliminate those unmatched rows coming from the outer joins.

Note that: I used the ANSI SQL-92 explicit LEFT OUTER JOIN syntax, instead of the old implicit OUTER and INNER join syntax that you sued in your query.

Please try to use the LEFT OUTER JOIN instead of the old outer join syntax, and avoid INNER JOIN after OUTER JOINs.

For more details, see these:


Update:

When you have many tables references in the FROM clause with the JOIN between them, each table is joined with the next table begging from the FROM clause1, results a temporary result set, then this temporary result set is joined with the next table and so on. In case of the OUTER JOIN, there are left or right:

  • LEFT JOIN will include those unmatched rows from the left table, where as,
  • RIGHT JOIN will include those unmatched rows from the right table.

Depending on the data you want to select, you have to watch out those tables in the two sides of the JOIN operator and the order of them.


1:This is just the logical query processing order, but in the actual order is always up to the query optimizer.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for those bad habbits pointing out :D –  bonCodigo Jan 13 '13 at 9:27
    
Thanks !, but is there a way using the implicit OUTER JOIN ? –  Nati Jan 13 '13 at 9:31
    
@Nati Sorry, I don't know about Oracle, and how implicit OUTER JOIN is done. You can, by LEFT JOIN all the same way I do in my answer, and don't do inner join after outer join. it will make it inner join. But try to use the explicit outer join syntax instead. –  Mahmoud Gamal Jan 13 '13 at 9:40
    
+1 for the links and advice. You should also point that the order of joining (when they are outer joins) does matter and may produce diferent result sets. t1 LEFT JOIN t2 ... LEFT JOIN t5 is not equivalent to t1 LEFT JOIN t5 LEFT JOIN t2 ... –  ypercube Jan 13 '13 at 9:49
1  
each table is joined with the next table begging from the FROM clause, results a temporary result set, then this temporary result set is joined with next table and so on The results that are returned will be as if that had happened, but actual order is always up to the optimizer. –  Shannon Severance Jan 13 '13 at 15:22

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