Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have function which gets a Seq[_] as an argument and returns an immutable class instance with this Seq as a val member. If the Seq is mutable I obviously want to create a defensive copy to guarantee that my return class instance cannot be modified.

What are the best practice for this pattern? First I was surprised that it is not possible to overload the function

  def fnc(arg: immutable.Seq[_]) = ...
  def fnc(arg: mutable.Seq[_]) = ...

I could also pattern-match:

  def fnc(arg: Seq[_]) = arg match {
    case s: immutable.Seq[_] => { println("immutable"); s}
    case s: mutable.Seq[_] => {println("mutable"); List()++s }
    case _: ?
  }   

But I am not sure about the _ case. Is it guaranteed that arg is immutable.Seq or mutable.Seq? I also don't know if List()++s is the correct way to convert it. I saw many posts on SO, but most of them where for 2.8 or earlier.

Are the Scala-Collections "intelligent" enough that I can just always (without pattern matching) write List()++s and I get the same instance if immutable and a deep copy if mutable?

What is the recommend way to do this?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You will need to pattern match if you want to support both,. The code for Seq() ++ does not guarantee (as part of its API) that it won't copy the rest if it's immutable:

scala> val v = Vector(1,2,3)
v: scala.collection.immutable.Vector[Int] = Vector(1, 2, 3)

scala> Seq() ++ v
res1: Seq[Int] = List(1, 2, 3)

It may pattern-match itself for some special cases, but you know the cases you want. So:

def fnc[A](arg: Seq[A]): Seq[A] = arg match {
  case s: collection.immutable.Seq[_] => arg
  case _ => Seq[A]() ++ arg
}

You needn't worry about the _; this just says you don't care exactly what the type argument is (not that you could check anyway), and if you write it this way, you don't: pass through if immutable, otherwise copy.

share|improve this answer

What are the best practice for this pattern?

If you want to guarantee immutability, the best practice is to make a defensive copy, or require immutable.Seq.

But I am not sure about the _ case. Is it guaranteed that arg is immutable.Seq or mutable.Seq?

Not necessarily, but I believe every standard library collection that inherits from collection.Seq also inherits from one of those two. A custom collection, however, could theoretically inherit from just collection.Seq. See Rex's answer for an improvement on your pattern-matching solution.

Are the Scala-Collections "intelligent" enough that I can just always (without pattern matching) write List()++s and I get the same instance if immutable and a deep copy if mutable?

It appears they are in certain cases but not others, for example:

val immutableSeq = Seq[Int](0, 1, 2)
println((Seq() ++ immutableSeq) eq immutableSeq) // prints true
val mutableSeq = mutable.Seq[Int](0, 1, 2)
println((Seq() ++ mutableSeq) eq mutableSeq) // prints false

Where eq is reference equality. Note that the above also works with List() ++ s, however as Rex pointed out, it does not work for all collections, like Vector.

share|improve this answer
    
@RexKerr Fixed! –  Alex DiCarlo Jan 13 '13 at 18:20

You certainly can overload in that way! E.g., this compiles fine:

object  MIO
{
  import collection.mutable

  def f1[A](s: Seq[A]) = 23
  def f1[A](s: mutable.Seq[A]) = 42

  def f2(s: Seq[_]) = 19
  def f2(s: mutable.Seq[_]) = 37
}

In the REPL:

Welcome to Scala version 2.10.0 (Java HotSpot(TM) 64-Bit Server VM, Java 1.6.0_37).
Type in expressions to have them evaluated.
Type :help for more information.

scala> import rrs.scribble.MIO._; import collection.mutable.Buffer
import rrs.scribble.MIO._
import collection.mutable.Buffer

scala> f1(List(1, 2, 3))
res0: Int = 23

scala> f1(Buffer(1, 2, 3))
res1: Int = 42

scala> f2(List(1, 2, 3))
res2: Int = 19

scala> f2(Buffer(1, 2, 3))
res3: Int = 37
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.