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Recently I came across this question like what are various CPU intensive operations in 'C' programming and I could think of below:

  1. Mathematical operations
  2. Appropriate choice of data structures based on need like in certain scenarios linked list might not be appropriate to store thousand of records
  3. ...

Appreciate any help?

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closed as not a real question by Frédéric Hamidi, Eelke, gspr, Jens Gustedt, simonc Jan 13 '13 at 11:56

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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Try infinite loops. –  Frédéric Hamidi Jan 13 '13 at 11:23
    
Hahaha! Thats good. Maybe op should change the question in "what certain operations should be avoided" or "what are common pitfalls in c, which waste cpu time". –  Peter Jan 13 '13 at 11:25
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Number 2 makes no sense. It literally makes no sense. –  cnicutar Jan 13 '13 at 11:26
    
Why are you interested in CPU intensive operations specific to C? –  Douglas Jan 13 '13 at 11:26
2  
I don't see any real question here. –  Jens Gustedt Jan 13 '13 at 11:38

2 Answers 2

Everything that does not involve system calls or loading/storing much data from/to memory is CPU intensive.

This follows simply from the fact that, if you do not make the CPU wait for other devices (memory, I/O), then the CPU runs as fast as it can, so everything is CPU intensive.

System calls may also be CPU intensive, by the same criteria: If they use the CPU and not other devices, they are CPU intensive. One exception would be a request to wait, which can allow the CPU to “rest” until some external event occurs.

There are some operations and arrangements of operations that may result in greater use of a CPU by causing more of its parts to work at the same time. This is, of course, dependent on the processor model and is a complex topic. There are also things that are “harder” for a processor to do, and there are arrangements of operations that processors can execute more or less quickly than other arrangements, due to issues of computer architecture. This is also a complicated topic.

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While it is not itself CPU intensive, but: context switches between kernel and userspace, i.e. read() or write() with small buffers

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