Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Possible Duplicate:
Access global variable from within a class

I want to fortify my knowledge in PHP. But most of the time I have trouble understanding with scopes. I am not sure when to use $this and global declaration keyword on my functions.

This is just an example class I just omitted the __construct()

    class myClass{
    public myVariable;

       public function1() {
          $this->myVariable=1;
       }

       public function2(){
          global $myVariable;
          $myVariable=1;
       }
    }

Which one is the best approach to use when assigning pre-declared variables inside a function? I am confused somehow by the different books by major publishers in PHP. I am not sure if I am asking the correct question or somehow relevant.

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Gordon, Pekka 웃, NullPoiиteя, OZ_, Anand Jan 13 '13 at 12:56

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
That's not valid PHP, for one thing. On the public myVariable, or the global $myVariable. –  Jared Farrish Jan 13 '13 at 12:07
2  
Try to avoid using global wherever possible, pass values as function/method arguments if necessary –  Mark Baker Jan 13 '13 at 12:11

3 Answers 3

First off, thats not valid PHP, as Jared Farrish already said. Its public $myvar instead of public myvar. Variable names always begin with $.

When you declare a variable in a class:

<?php
class A
{
    private $var;
}

That variable will be automatically available in all methods if accessed through $this (unless the method static, but that is another story). So this would work:

<?php
class A
{
    private $var;

    public function foo () {
        // This works 
        $this->var = 1;

        // This is a completely different thing and does not change
        // the contents of A::$var
        $var = 1; 
    }
}

Now global is a different thing altogether. In PHP, you cant do this:

<?php
$global_a = 123;

function myfunc ()
{
    // You wont actually change the value of $global_a with this
    $global_a = 1234;
}
echo $global_a; // still 123

You'd think this would work, but global variables aren't automatically available to functions. This is where global comes in:

<?php 
$global_a = 123;

function myfunc ()
{
    global $global_a;
    $global_a = 1234;
}
echo $global_a; // now it will be 1234

I suggest you read about variable scope in PHP and then you can go on to OOP in PHP.

PHP is a very quirky language. Just because something works in most languages in a certain way doesn't mean it will work in PHP. Most of the times, it wont. So its best to educate yourself as much as possible.

Hope this helps

share|improve this answer
    
oh yes that's invalid sorry I missed the $ sign on the public $myVariable. Just having trouble with scopes. Thanks for spotting it by the way. Thanks for clarifying that in detail. I guess I will stick to $this approach. Your explanation really cleared my doubt about using global and when to use it. –  Matthew Gatioan Jan 13 '13 at 13:03

Which one is best often depends on the situation. In general it's best to avoid global variables as they bring risks with them of not knowing exactly where they're used.

Using a class variable is a good option if the variable is specific to that instance of the class. (You will have to prefix it with a $, though. I.e., public $myVariable;).

If the variable is only relevant to the function and instances outside the class, you'd do best to pass it as an reference. This is done by adding an & before the $ in the parameter space. I.e.:

public function3(&$myVariable) {
    $myVariable = 1;
}

Or alternatively just return the value you wish and set it outside the function. I.e.,:

class MyClass {
    public function3() {
        return 1;
    }
}

$myObject = new MyClass();
$myVariable = $myObject->function4();
share|improve this answer

try to avoid passing global variable,as there are many good reasons for that:

  1. Reusing parts of the script is impossible : If a certain function relies on global variables, it becomes almost impossible to use that function in a different context. Another problem is that you can’t take that function, and use it in another script.

  2. Solving bugs is much harder : Tracking a global variable is much harder than a non-global variable.

  3. Understanding the code in a year will be much more difficult : Globals make it difficult to see where a variable is coming from and what it does.

Now your questions:

Which one is the best approach to use when assigning pre-declared variables inside a function?
You can pass them by value or reference inside a function

By value

$firstVar = 1;

function abc($firstVar){
    echo $firstVar ; // will give you 1
}

By reference

function abc(&$firstVar){
    $firstVar = 3;   // this will give utility to change that variable even
    echo $firstVar ; // will give you 3
}

Now where to use $this variable:

$this is used to refer to the current object. example:

class abc{
    private $firstVar;

    function abc(){
        $this->firstVar = 2;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
yep this approach is what I often use for a long time up to now. Passing them as parameters on the function. It's been a year since I played around with major PHP coding and I forgot some important things. My coding style is classless and I thought I go in depth with classes and OOP so I am reading on "PHP5 and MySQL Bible" and I came across $this which made me confused as I frequently use globals on my scripts even though I don't understand it completely. Thanks for the explanation –  Matthew Gatioan Jan 13 '13 at 13:14

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.