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In a data management step of my analyses I incurred into the following problem.

In practice, each id is recorded up to 5 times, and I have a time-varying variable of interest, tv = 1, 2, 3, 4. Suppose my data are:

dat <- read.table(text = "

        id      tv    
        1       2
        1       2
        1       1
        1       4
        2       4
        2       1
        2       4
        3       1
        3       2
        3       3
        3       3
        3       2", 

    header=TRUE)  

What I need to do is to create two newly sets of variables starting from tv, in order to obtain:

   id     tv     tv1   tv2   tv3   tv4   tv5    dur1  dur2  dur3  dur4  dur5 
    1      2      2     1     4     0     0       2     1     1     0     0
    1      2      2     1     4     0     0       2     1     1     0     0
    1      1      2     1     4     0     0       2     1     1     0     0
    1      4      2     1     4     0     0       2     1     1     0     0
    2      4      4     1     4     0     0       1     1     1     0     0
    2      1      4     1     4     0     0       1     1     1     0     0
    2      4      4     1     4     0     0       1     1     1     0     0
    3      1      1     2     3     2     0       1     1     2     1     0
    3      2      1     2     3     2     0       1     1     2     1     0
    3      3      1     2     3     2     0       1     1     2     1     0
    3      3      1     2     3     2     0       1     1     2     1     0
    3      2      1     2     3     2     0       1     1     2     1     0

For each id, in tv1-tv5 we have the ordered sequence of distinct (non-repeated) records of tv, while in dur1-dur5 we have the number of times the respective distinct records are present in the original dataset dat.

I really don't know how to proceed here.. Any help will be greatly appreciated.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This should do it:

require(plyr)
dat <- structure(list(id = c(1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 3L, 3L, 3L, 
         3L, 3L), tv = c(2L, 2L, 1L, 4L, 4L, 1L, 4L, 1L, 2L, 3L, 3L, 2L
         )), .Names = c("id", "tv"), class = "data.frame", row.names = c(NA, 
         -12L))

out <- ddply(dat, .(id), function(x) {
    this.rle <- rle(x$tv)

    val <- this.rle$values
    val <- c(val, rep(0, 5-length(val)))
    val <- matrix(rep(val,nrow(x)), byrow=T, nrow=nrow(x))
    val <- as.data.frame(val)
    names(val) <- paste("tv", 1:5, sep="")

    len <- this.rle$lengths
    len <- c(len, rep(0, 5-length(len)))
    len <- matrix(rep(len,nrow(x)), byrow=T, nrow=nrow(x))
    len <- as.data.frame(len)
    names(len) <- paste("dur", 1:5, sep="")
    cbind(data.frame(tv=x$tv), val, len)
})

> out
   id tv tv1 tv2 tv3 tv4 tv5 dur1 dur2 dur3 dur4 dur5
1   1  2   2   1   4   0   0    2    1    1    0    0
2   1  2   2   1   4   0   0    2    1    1    0    0
3   1  1   2   1   4   0   0    2    1    1    0    0
4   1  4   2   1   4   0   0    2    1    1    0    0
5   2  4   4   1   4   0   0    1    1    1    0    0
6   2  1   4   1   4   0   0    1    1    1    0    0
7   2  4   4   1   4   0   0    1    1    1    0    0
8   3  1   1   2   3   2   0    1    1    2    1    0
9   3  2   1   2   3   2   0    1    1    2    1    0
10  3  3   1   2   3   2   0    1    1    2    1    0
11  3  3   1   2   3   2   0    1    1    2    1    0
12  3  2   1   2   3   2   0    1    1    2    1    0
share|improve this answer
    
Wonderful!! Thanks a lot. –  Stezzo Jan 13 '13 at 13:16
1  
Great use of rle(). I'm not too familiar with plyr, but I think you can simplify this a little bit, right? I don't think you need to convert the matrix to a data.frame, for example, and doing so would definitely add to the processing time. –  Ananda Mahto Jan 13 '13 at 19:55
    
It's a good solution though, and presented in a way that makes it easy to understand what is going on. Made me look into plyr a little bit more too! –  Ananda Mahto Jan 13 '13 at 20:04
    
@AnandaMahto If you have time I have a simulation problem which can probably be solved through -plyr- here: link –  Stezzo Jan 17 '13 at 19:31

Here's a solution entirely in base R. It is very similar to @Arun's answer, but will likely be faster than using "plyr":

out <- cbind(dat, do.call(
    rbind, 
    lapply(split(dat$tv, dat$id), function(x) {
        OUT <- matrix(0, ncol = 10, nrow = 1)
        T1 <- rle(x)
        OUT[1, seq_along(T1$values)] <- T1$values
        OUT[1, 6:(5+length(T1$lengths))] <- T1$lengths
        colnames(OUT) <- paste(rep(c("tv", "dur"), 
                                   each = 5), 1:5, sep ="")
        OUT[rep(1, length(x)), ]
    })))
out
#    id tv tv1 tv2 tv3 tv4 tv5 dur1 dur2 dur3 dur4 dur5
# 1   1  2   2   1   4   0   0    2    1    1    0    0
# 2   1  2   2   1   4   0   0    2    1    1    0    0
# 3   1  1   2   1   4   0   0    2    1    1    0    0
# 4   1  4   2   1   4   0   0    2    1    1    0    0
# 5   2  4   4   1   4   0   0    1    1    1    0    0
# 6   2  1   4   1   4   0   0    1    1    1    0    0
# 7   2  4   4   1   4   0   0    1    1    1    0    0
# 8   3  1   1   2   3   2   0    1    1    2    1    0
# 9   3  2   1   2   3   2   0    1    1    2    1    0
# 10  3  3   1   2   3   2   0    1    1    2    1    0
# 11  3  3   1   2   3   2   0    1    1    2    1    0
# 12  3  2   1   2   3   2   0    1    1    2    1    0

Here's a summary of what's happening:

  1. split(dat$tv, dat$id) creates a list of values in "tv" for each "id".

  2. We apply an anonymous function in which we:

    1. Create an empty one-row matrix of zeroes. We already know we need 10 columns.
    2. Store the output of rle() since we need both the "values" and "lengths"
    3. Use basic subsetting to insert "values" into the first five columns of the matrix, and "lengths" as the last five columns.
    4. Add in your column names
    5. Use a little trick to "expand" your matrix to a specified number of rows, in this case, the same number of rows as there are rows per group.
  3. do.call(rbind... puts all the matrices together, binding them by rows.

  4. cbind(dat... binds the original data.frame to the result from steps 1 to 3.

Again, conceptually, this is very similar to Arun's answer--the use of rle() was probably what you were missing.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much, both the answers are very instructive. And you are right, your script is faster. –  Stezzo Jan 13 '13 at 21:42

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