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Could you explain me step by step the result of the second instruction?

I know how foldr works in this cases:

foldr (*) 1 [-3..-1]
-6

But I don't know how to deal with the function (\y z -> y*3 + z) in a foldr expression.

foldr (\y z -> y*3 + z) 0 [1..4]
30
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A similar question: stackoverflow.com/a/11425454/1400768 –  nhahtdh Jan 13 '13 at 13:17
1  
You can think of y as the current element, and z as the accumulator. The return value of the unnamed function will be put into the accumulator when the unnamed function is called for the next element. This is one way to understand the function. –  nhahtdh Jan 13 '13 at 13:22
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what nhahtdh said above, with a slight twist: you imagine a parenthesization. The first argument y gets the current element, left-to-right, and the second one z gets the result of transforming the rest of the input list: (1*3 + (2*3 + (3*3 + (4*3 + 0)))). –  Will Ness Jan 13 '13 at 17:19
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1 Answer

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Let's look at the definition of foldr:

foldr f z []     = z 
foldr f z (x:xs) = f x (foldr f z xs) 

Now, in your example,

f y z = y*3 + z

So, just using the definitions:

foldr f 0 [1..4] = 
f 1 (foldr f 0 [2..4]) =
f 1 (f 2 (foldr f 0 [3,4])) =
f 1 (f 2 (f 3 (foldr f 0 [4]))) =
f 1 (f 2 (f 3 (f 4 (foldr f 0 [])))) =
f 1 (f 2 (f 3 (f 4 0))) =
f 1 (f 2 (f 3 12))) = 
f 1 (f 2 21) =
f 1 27 =
30
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I think the reduction sequence is different: for f y z = y*3 + z, foldr f 0 [1..4] = f 1 (foldr f 0 [2..4]) = 1*3+(foldr f 0 [2..4]) = 3+(f 2 (foldr f 0 [3,4])) = 3+(2*3+(foldr f 0 [3,4])) = ... = 3+(6+(9+(4*3+foldr f 0 []))) = ... –  Will Ness Jan 13 '13 at 17:25
    
@WillNess I didn't pay any attention to the way it would actually be reduced by Haskell - shame on me! I think it would be very helpful if you posted that as a separate answer, maybe with a small comment on why the reduction method is important. –  us2012 Jan 13 '13 at 17:30
    
it's good enough as it is. :) Why it is important? just because it is how it is, that's all. (+) is strict, so forces its left arg first, then its right arg - putting the first one on the stack. etc. :) btw you could edit your answer if you prefer. –  Will Ness Jan 13 '13 at 17:36
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