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I'm writing a CSV library in Ruby (I know, the standard one is great!) mostly for fun. Currently it is about 4 times slower than the standard and I find it weird because of the following : I have looked at csv.rb from stdlib and it uses regular expressions to split the rows, which I expect to be not very fast. In my library I use a DFA so I'm sure it will run in O(n) time - I have almost no backtracking, there is only on case when I backtrack once to accomodate for a deviant case (escape char == quote char) and it happens only about 1% of the time.

So I profiled my code obviously and here is the part that takes up 89% of the total run time. It is a loop that is run for every char of the input file :

def consume token
  if !@separator and [:BEFORE_FIELD, :FIELD, :BEFORE_SEPARATOR].include?(@state)
    if @potential_separators.include? token
      @separator = token
    end
  end

  #puts "#{@state} - Token: #{token}"
  @state = case @state
  when :QUOTED_FIELD
    if @escape.include? token
      @last_escape_used = token
      :MAYBE_ESCAPED_QUOTE
    elsif token == @quote
      :BEFORE_SEPARATOR
    else
      @field += token
      :QUOTED_FIELD
    end
  when :FIELD
    case token
    when @newline
      got_field
      got_row
      :BEFORE_FIELD
    when @separator
      got_field
      :BEFORE_FIELD
    else
      @field += token
      :FIELD
    end
  when :BEFORE_FIELD
    case token
    when @separator
      got_field
      :BEFORE_FIELD
    when @quote
      :QUOTED_FIELD
    when @newline
      got_field
      got_row
      :BEFORE_FIELD
    else
      @field += token
      :FIELD
    end
  when :MAYBE_ESCAPED_QUOTE
    if token == @quote
      @field += @quote
      :QUOTED_FIELD
    elsif @last_escape_used == @quote
      @state = :BEFORE_SEPARATOR
      consume token
    else
      @field += @last_escape_used
      @field += token
      :QUOTED_FIELD
    end
  when :BEFORE_SEPARATOR
    case token
    when @separator
      got_field
      :BEFORE_FIELD
    when @newline
      got_field
      got_row
      :BEFORE_FIELD
    else
      raise "Error: Separator or newline expected! Got: #{token} at (#{@line}:#{@column})"
    end
  end

  if token == @newline
    @column =  1
    @line   += 1
  else
    @column += token.length
  end
  #puts "[#{@line}:#{@column} - #{token}] Switched to #{@state}"
  #if token == @quote then exit end
  @state
end

Here is the profiling output :

KCacheGrind profiling output

Moreover it is really the consume function itself that is slow and not the few functions it calls, because the Self part is as high as 62% of total runtime!

Details of what happens in #consume function are:

KCacheGrind profiling details

I thought the case @state might be the culprit so the first thing I did was put the most frequent cases at the top (and I benchmarked : no change). The code seems pretty clean to me and I don't really see where I can gain much but still I find it weird that it is so much slower than the standard lib.

By the way the file I'm testing this on is a 2MB CSV file. I read it line by line and store nothing in memory. If I replace my consume function with a function doing nothing I get the same speed as Ruby standard CSV (but of course it does nothing :)) so I think I can conclude the bottleneck is not in I/O.

share|improve this question
    
Does your approach use a very high number of if/else or other branching statements compared to the standard library? Regexes may appear slow, but preventing the CPU from using branch prediction can be a pretty negative effect. –  Chris Hayes Jan 13 '13 at 13:23
    
Mostly the ones in the code I pasted here, there's a bunch but nothing extravagant I think –  djfm Jan 13 '13 at 13:27
    
For non-pathological regexes I'd expect regex engines to be very fast, because they're native, and obsessively tweaked. Note that many use a DFA, and a native one. You might be interested in this article, and perhaps even more so in the three articles it references: interesting stuff (for geekier values of "interesting"). –  Dave Newton Jan 13 '13 at 13:41
    
That method is way too large. For sanity’s sake, split it into smaller, well-contained methods. This may slow things down a tiny bit (due to the overhead of function calls), but it makes the code far easier to digest. –  Andrew Marshall Jan 13 '13 at 15:07
    
Properly written regular expressions are extremely fast. I've done many benchmarks on SO comparing them to other algorithms and except for very specific uses, a well written regex will win. That said, a poorly written one can waste CPU time badly, in addition to be difficult to maintain. –  the Tin Man Jan 13 '13 at 18:43

1 Answer 1

Two points:

  • You seem to have a lot of some_array.include?(something). This is slow. Try to replace it with a hash like so:

    some_hash = {this_key => true, that_key => true, ...}

    and use it like some_hash[something].

  • You seem to have a lot of some_string += another_string. This is slow. Try instead:

    some_string << another_string

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, replacing the +='s with <<'s yielded a small gain (down from 1600ms to 1400ms!). As for the array.include? they are actually sets except one but called very few times. –  djfm Jan 13 '13 at 14:01

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