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Under windows, when I need to perform a basic calculations, I use a built-in calculator. Now I would like to find out what is the common way if you only have a shell.

Thanks

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1  
I can't believe no one's proposed a Perl solution! ;-) –  Dennis Williamson Sep 16 '09 at 4:11
    
there also exist numerous gui-based calculators for linux. but dc or bc is fine –  knittl Sep 16 '09 at 9:18

9 Answers 9

up vote 3 down vote accepted

And you can always use the python interpreter, it's normally included in linux distros.

http://docs.python.org/tutorial/introduction.html#using-python-as-a-calculator

$ python
Python 2.6.2 (r262:71605, Apr 14 2009, 22:40:02) [MSC v.1500 32 bit (Intel)]
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>> 2+2
4
>>> # This is a comment
... 2+2
4
>>> 2+2  # and a comment on the same line as code
4
>>> (50-5*6)/4
5
>>> # Integer division returns the floor:
... 7/3
2
>>> 7/-3
-3
>>> # use float to get floating point results.
>>> 7/3.0
2.3333333333333335

The equal sign ('=') is used to assign a value to a variable. Afterwards, no result is displayed before the next interactive prompt:

>>> width = 20
>>> height = 5*9
>>> width * height
900

And of course there's the math module which should solve most of your calculator needs.

>>> import math
>>> math.pi
3.1415926535897931
>>> math.e
2.7182818284590451
>>> math.cos() # cosine
>>> math.sqrt()
>>> math.log()
>>> math.log10()
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Yes, use the interactive python interpreter :-). My Dave –  jskaggz Sep 16 '09 at 7:04

You can use dc. Or bc.

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dc if you prefer RPN (Forth-like), bc if you prefer infix notation (C-like) –  Dennis Williamson Sep 16 '09 at 4:14
    
Right. (But RPN is a sacred geek creed; let us not show disrespect for it by saying it is like unto another, brother ;) –  alphazero Sep 16 '09 at 12:13
    
A true believer writes his prose subject object verb : "RPN, sacred geek creed, is." –  Dennis Williamson Sep 16 '09 at 13:38
    
Subject object verb a true believer his prose writes: "RPN, sacred geek creed, is." –  Dave Jarvis Sep 16 '09 at 20:50

From this web page (for csh and derivatives, since you asked):

% @ x = (354 - 128 + 52 * 5 / 3)
% echo Result is $x
Result is 174

and

% set y = (354 - 128 + 52 / 3)
% echo Result is $y
Result is 354 - 128 + 52 / 3

notice the different results.

Personally, I stick to /bin/sh and call awk or something (for maximal portability), or others have exhibited the bash approach.

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Bash supports basic (integer only) arithmetic inside $(( )):

$ echo $(( 100 / 3 ))
33
$ myvar="56"
$ echo $(( $myvar + 12 ))
68
$ echo $(( $myvar - $myvar ))
0
$ myvar=$(( $myvar + 1 ))
$ echo $myvar
57

(example copied straight from the IBM link)

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+1 And, I also use it for fixed-point non-integer questions by adding zeroes in the equation and inserting decimal points in my head. :) –  Don Branson Sep 16 '09 at 20:49
    
Along these lines, ((...)) is similar but as a command (does not substitute result, $? gets set), and $[...] is short for $((...)). –  ephemient Sep 16 '09 at 21:16

There are many good solutions given here, but the 'classic' way to do arithmetic in the shell is with expr.

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The only caveat is that, since "*" is a special character in shell, you need to escape it when doing multiplication with expr. E.g. $ expr 1 + 2 * 3 expr: syntax error $ expr 1 + 2 * 3 7 –  DVK Sep 16 '09 at 20:44

If you're using bash, here's a handy example of a small shell script that allows you to do calculations from the command line (including specifying precision for floating-point numbers):

http://www.novell.com/coolsolutions/tools/17043.html

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It uses bc. –  Dennis Williamson Sep 16 '09 at 4:16
    
Yes, it does. It just adds the ability to invoke it easily as single-line command as opposed to a program that then takes input. –  Amber Sep 16 '09 at 4:47

I know this is technically not arithmetic from the shell, but most modern distributions come with ruby and IRB (interactive ruby shell) which is perfect for this sort of thing (assuming you know a bit of Ruby). Another alternative is invoking the python interpreter which starts in an interactive shell if you don't provide any arguments.

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You can also use Perl easily where bc or expr are not powerful enough:

$ perl5.8 -e '$a=1+2; print "$a\n"' 
3
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Alternative option is to use the built in BC command

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