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Why do

my $i=0;
my @arr=();

sub readall {
    foreach (@_) {
        $arr[$i] = shift @_;
        $i++;
    }
}

readall(1, 2, 3, 4, 5);
print "@arr"

and

my $i=0;
my @arr=();

sub readall {
    foreach (@_) {
        $arr[$i] = shift @_;
        print $arr[$i];
        $i++;
    }
}

readall(1, 2, 3, 4, 5);

print only three of the arguments to readall?

Why does this function, which seems like it should behave the same, process all five arguments?

sub readall {
    foreach (@_) {
        print $_;
    }
}

readall(1, 2, 3, 4, 5);

This also reads all five (but does operate on a different principle):

my @arr=();

sub readall {
    push(@arr, @_);
}

readall(1, 2, 3, 4, 5);
print "@arr"
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5  
Your posts would be much easier to read if you posted proper scripts rather than 100char long one-liners. You'd also get syntax highlighting if you used a proper editor. –  Mat Jan 13 '13 at 14:05
    
Thank you all guys you helped a lot. To @Mat thank you for suggestion I will try. –  Wakan Tanka Jan 13 '13 at 14:28

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Every time you shift your array, it gets shorter... So you are not operating on the whole array, and it will stop early. You can see this by adding a line to your code:

perl -wlae 'my $i=0; my @arr=(); sub readall {foreach (@_) {$arr[$i]=shift @_; $i++; print @_;}} readall(1,2,3,4,5); print "@arr"'

2345
345
45

I assume you can figure it out from here.

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1  
note that modifying (adding or removing elements) the array you are looping over is explicitly not supported. if you wish to do so, loop over indexes instead: for (my $index = 0; $index < @array; ++$index ) { } –  ysth Jan 13 '13 at 19:14

Using foreach and shift on the same array may be causing confusion. Both the ones that fail use it, both that dont.. dont.

Just changing shift @_ to $_ fixes it.

This is happening because you are shortening the array as you are iterating.

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You iterate over all arguments in @_, simultaneously shifting @_ to make it shorter:

sub readall {foreach (@_) {$arr[$i]=shift @_ ....}

Let great perlists here explain what's expected in this case, what's documented and why you shouldn't do it. For me it's just logically wrong, and does not make any sense. Perhaps s/foreach/while/ is more idiomatic (at least, it works).

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shift @_ inside of foreach (@_) is wrong, getting rid of it fixes the array walk:

$ perl -wlae 'my $i=0; my @arr=(); sub readall {foreach (@_) {$arr[$i]=$_[$i]; $i++}} readall(1,2,3,4,5); print "@arr"'
1 2 3 4 5

foreach works referencing $_ to each element of the array:

$ perl -wlae 'my @arr=(1..5);foreach (@arr) { $_ *= 2 }; foreach (@arr) { print }'
2
4
6
8
10

So dereferencing an element with an unshift/pop messes everything.

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